You are Unregistered, please register to be able to read posts in all forums and participate in the discussion.
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default Missed shots from a treestand

    After fifteen years of bowhunting, I've finally decided to abandon my hopes for a big Buck and take a few Does for the table. (Translation, I have never taken a deer with a bow.) Since this seasons opener, I have missed 5 Does. My arrows consistently fly over the deers back.

    I am hunting from a treestand. My stand is set at sixteen feet and when standing for a shot, I assume I am at around twenty feet in the air. I have repeatedly ranged the field corner, where I am hunting, and have ranges from 16 - 32 yards. Most of the deer come across the field and into my corner at about 25 - 30 yards, broadside.

    The first deer I shot over was mis-ranged. She was thirty, I shot 40 yards. However, the next deer was at a solid 25 yards. I put the twenty yard pin on the lower third of here vitals and pulled the trigger. To my dismay, there was nothing but back hair in my Spitfire Pro. Even though her head was down and she was grazing, she dropped pretty quickly at the sound of the bow.

    I am shooting a Mathews "LX" set at 60 lbs, with a Trophy Taker drop away rest and CX 200 arrows cut to 25-/1/2" with 100 grain Spitfire broadheads. I have even taken to putting Sims strips on the riser shelf, under the prongs to silence the bow. The bow is extremely quite and launches an arrow at 276 fps. So, I am confident in my equipment and shot making ability out to 40 yards. But, I continue to shoot over the backs of these deer.

    Last night, I launched three arrows at three different Does. I had them ranged at thirty yards, put the thirty yard pin on the lower third of the vitals and shot right over their backs. I even put the twenty yard pin on one that was a little closer and zipped right over the back of her. I saw my final arrow shoot 1 foot over the deers back!

    Can the angle and height of my shots make that much difference? At our archery club, standing at about 14 feet, on our treestand station, I am dead-on from 10 to 20 yards. Why then, are my shots going so high, when I am in my hunting treestand? Should I switch to a pendulum sight or just climb into a treestand of the same height in my backyard and try to dial the bow in. I am becoming increasingly frustrated and would appreciate some sound advice and insight. I am afraid my friends are going to start calling me "Vegetarian" if I don't put some venison on the table soon.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    14

    Default

    When you practice your shots from the stands do you only shoot field points or have you shot your broadheads? If not shoot your broadheads. I usually am up around 20 feet and hit a doe dead on at 12 yards on the first of October.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Roscoe, IL
    Posts
    96

    Default Broad heads or Form

    Shoot your broadheads and see if they shoot the same as your target tips, from the ground or tree. If they don't then you will have to tune for them, or by some mechanicals that open up on impact. If they do then your not keeping your arm/shoulders square with your body, as if you where on the ground. That's why they created pendulums, they compensate for the angle created(less than 90) when you just move your arms down at an angle to the deer, instead of bending at the waste to keep everything the same as if you were on the ground. Hope this helps otherwise go get a pendulum I haven't heard anything bad about them, just haven't shot with one. Good luck!!

  4. #4

    Default

    Shots from 20ft up and ranged with a rangefinder will go high. Especially at close range. If you 20yard pin is zeroed in on the ground and you are 20 ft in the air, if that doe is 15 yards you will have to aim LOW to hit it. At under 10 yards you will probably have to hold so low you are aiming about 3-4 inches under the deer.

    Climb up in your tree and range a leaf or something you can get a good bead on and shoot at it. You will notice the shot goes high. Now you will know how low you will have to hold. Deer ducking the arrow or jumping the string is a pain and does happen. I now aim at the heart so if they don't duck, I get a heart shot. If they do, I get lungs. Usually end up with a lung shot.

    The reason they go high is gravity only works in one direction. Normal arrow trajectory climbs, levels and falls. When you shoot at a downward angle the amount of climb required is less than when shooting on level ground. I hope this make sense.

    One other MAJOR important note: You must bend at the waist. You want to maintain the 'T' formation as much as possible.

    I hope this helps.
    Chris Christenson - Admin
    3DShoots.com - Find Archery Shoots near you
    ObsessionArchery.com - Archery Supplies

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    N.IL
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Is it possible that your anchor point changes while shooting from a stand? At thirty yards your bow should not shoot that high.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I would also suggest practicing bending at the waist with the same gear you're hunting in, including your gloves.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris
    Shots from 20ft up and ranged with a rangefinder will go high. Especially at close range. If you 20yard pin is zeroed in on the ground and you are 20 ft in the air, if that doe is 15 yards you will have to aim LOW to hit it. At under 10 yards you will probably have to hold so low you are aiming about 3-4 inches under the deer.

    Climb up in your tree and range a leaf or something you can get a good bead on and shoot at it. You will notice the shot goes high. Now you will know how low you will have to hold. Deer ducking the arrow or jumping the string is a pain and does happen. I now aim at the heart so if they don't duck, I get a heart shot. If they do, I get lungs. Usually end up with a lung shot.

    The reason they go high is gravity only works in one direction. Normal arrow trajectory climbs, levels and falls. When you shoot at a downward angle the amount of climb required is less than when shooting on level ground. I hope this make sense.

    One other MAJOR important note: You must bend at the waist. You want to maintain the 'T' formation as much as possible.

    I hope this helps.
    so true, i couldnt have said it better myself

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default @ things you need to do ...

    1) buy, install and start shooting a Whisker Biscuit and a pendulum sight such as the Trophy Ridge sight or ANY good pendulum sight. I guarantee you will have better success. No guess work in ranging the target from 0 to 35 yards, no worrying about keeping your arrow on your rest, you can really concentrate on just keeping one pin on the deer.

    2) buy a 3D deer target and start shooting with your pendulum sight from a raised shooting postion (one you shoot at) either from a safe spot on your roof, a secure tree stand in your yard, a freinds yard or at your hunting location

    do these and youll be good

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1

    Default Missed Shots

    Quote Originally Posted by RuffedgrouseII
    After fifteen years of bowhunting, I've finally decided to abandon my hopes for a big Buck and take a few Does for the table. (Translation, I have never taken a deer with a bow.) Since this seasons opener, I have missed 5 Does. My arrows consistently fly over the deers back.

    I am hunting from a treestand. My stand is set at sixteen feet and when standing for a shot, I assume I am at around twenty feet in the air. I have repeatedly ranged the field corner, where I am hunting, and have ranges from 16 - 32 yards. Most of the deer come across the field and into my corner at about 25 - 30 yards, broadside.

    The first deer I shot over was mis-ranged. She was thirty, I shot 40 yards. However, the next deer was at a solid 25 yards. I put the twenty yard pin on the lower third of here vitals and pulled the trigger. To my dismay, there was nothing but back hair in my Spitfire Pro. Even though her head was down and she was grazing, she dropped pretty quickly at the sound of the bow.

    I am shooting a Mathews "LX" set at 60 lbs, with a Trophy Taker drop away rest and CX 200 arrows cut to 25-/1/2" with 100 grain Spitfire broadheads. I have even taken to putting Sims strips on the riser shelf, under the prongs to silence the bow. The bow is extremely quite and launches an arrow at 276 fps. So, I am confident in my equipment and shot making ability out to 40 yards. But, I continue to shoot over the backs of these deer.

    Last night, I launched three arrows at three different Does. I had them ranged at thirty yards, put the thirty yard pin on the lower third of the vitals and shot right over their backs. I even put the twenty yard pin on one that was a little closer and zipped right over the back of her. I saw my final arrow shoot 1 foot over the deers back!

    Can the angle and height of my shots make that much difference? At our archery club, standing at about 14 feet, on our treestand station, I am dead-on from 10 to 20 yards. Why then, are my shots going so high, when I am in my hunting treestand? Should I switch to a pendulum sight or just climb into a treestand of the same height in my backyard and try to dial the bow in. I am becoming increasingly frustrated and would appreciate some sound advice and insight. I am afraid my friends are going to start calling me "Vegetarian" if I don't put some venison on the table soon.
    HI TRY PAPER TESTING YOUR BOW AND THEN IF THAT DOESN'T WORK TRY GOING TO A DIFFERENT ARROW REST I THINK SOME OF THE NEW DROP AWAYS ARE GOOD BUT IF THERE IS ANY INCONSISTENTCIES IN YOUR ARROWS YOU CAN GET FLIERS ALSO BROADHEADS DONOT FLY THE SAME AS FIELD TIPS SO SHOOT YOUR BROADHEADS TO SEE WHERE T HEY R GOING BUT IF YOU HAVE DONE ALL OF THIS THEN THE PROBLEM MAY BE THAT WHEN SHOOTING FROM A TREESTAND PEOPLE NATURALLY DROP OR RAISE THIER SHOOTING ARM AS THE RELEASE LETS GO MAKE SURE YOUR RELEASE IS NOT SET TO HEAVY THAT CAN MAKE YOU LIFT OR LOWER YOUR ARM AFTER THE SHOT

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Did you adopt any of these changes for 05', if so, have they helped?

    I've missed three does high in the last two seasons, two last season and one opening day this year. I was tuned and ready, 20-25 yard shots, and sure enough flew right over the top. All misses have been from a 14ft stand.

    Last season I shot thunderheads and thought possibly the fixed blade caused a planing high. Nope, shot a steelhead expandable and had the same result.

    I'm thinking it's the "bend at the waist" issue. I don't have access to a stand and practice entirely on the ground. Interested to hear what you've come up with, as well as any other opinions on this.

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4

    Default

    It would seem to me that if you practiced from the same height that you intend to hunt with the same equipment that you intend to hunt with ,the results should be very predictable.Also, your bow should be sighted in from that elevated position,rangedfinder varified from that same position,to ensure repeatability. If you dont bend at the waiste when you sighted in ,then you won't have to bend at the waiste when the shot comes.
    Practice what you intend to do during the hunting scenario with what you intend to do it with.When that shot finally does come,all the practice that you did should subconciously come thru without you having to remember to do this or do that. Do remember the old addage however, PICK A SPOT. AIM. and FOLLOW THRU.

Similar Threads

  1. Everyone misses. What was the easiest shot you missed?
    By Daniel Boone in forum Bowhunting forum
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-27-2008, 10:27 PM
  2. 3D Bonus Shots
    By SC Archery in forum General Archery Forum
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 07-11-2008, 09:35 PM
  3. I Missed Another One I Missed Another One
    By Werd in forum Bowhunting forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-20-2007, 01:50 AM
  4. erratic shots
    By Bob4 in forum Beginners Archery Range
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 10-12-2007, 10:50 AM
  5. How many shots?
    By shaft in forum General Archery Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-29-2006, 06:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •