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  1. #1
    Jerry Whittington
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    Default shooting back tension

    I've read several threads and post regarding how to properly shoot backtension...so here is my scoop;

    For the biggest percentage of archers out there, I do believe that a subconscious release is the best/and most consistent way to release an arrow.... there are a few that can punch and place the arrow consistently in the middle.

    As I stated above, I think a subconscious release is best for most folks...and it should be done with using back tension to activate the release regardless of type style of release used. Knowing how to use back tension and the commitment to learn is the key...
    Here is how I learned: and it took a lot of time and dedication on my part.

    Your draw length has to be correct! No question about it! If the archer’s draw length is to long, he/she going to have two problems. Your gong to experience left and right impacts and the inability to build constant pressure to activate the release within the time period or “ shot window” which is between 4- 6 seconds.

    Here is my experience with shooting a hinge:
    I initially had to shoot the hinge with some travel for two reasons…to “un time’ myself, and remove fear of misfire when drawing the release.
    What I mean by “un time myself” is to eliminate anticipation. I had to learn how to aim longer. My shooting improved, but only temporarily because anticipation came back. To compensate, I had to change the speed of my hinge by making it either slower or faster. This is why I think most hinge shooters have 3-4 identical hinge releases, but each one is set with different speeds. Randy Ulmer was the first that archer that I witnessed using this technique. In my opinion, these guys are not truly nor only using back tension to activate the release.

    I have a friend who competes in the men’s pro (3-D and spots) class. He primarily shoots a hinge release, but does not entirely depend on back tension alone to activate the shot. He uses his fingers to rotate the lease in order to make it fire. (From what I have been told and read, rotating the release is how Mel Stanislaswski recommends shooting the release.) He does occasionally fight anticipation. When this happens he simply changes the speed in his releases to compensate. I tried this for a while. The problem that I experienced is that the arrow’s point of impact will be different between the releases set at different speed. The impact difference is not a lot, but noticeable. When this happened I got a little steamed at myself (a no, no) because I made a good shot, but didn’t hit my spot or 12 ring. I began doubting myself, thinking it was I. I consulted my pro buddy, and he confirmed that he has the same experience. The difference in the point of impact is due to the different speeds of the release. I can only assume that the different speeds/pitch of the hinges cause the archer to anchor their release hand slightly different which affected the impact. That’s what makes sense to me.
    The majority of top archery coaches that I have spoke with endorse the use of a hinge releases, and to set them with a slow speed. I don’t agree.
    What is my theory on how to shoot a hinge release? As much as I hate to admit it, I have to agree with Bernie Pellerite’s book, Idiot Proof Archery. His theory is this “ They (the hinge release) needs to be set very quick (light) if you want to use back tension only to set them of”. To summarize is theory, If your thinking about making the release go off, then your not aiming. And when your not totally focused on aiming is the primary reason that you missed.

    This is what worked for me. Most archers (including myself) are initially to scared of setting their hinge release this light because of the fear of busting their mouths, and slinging an arrow for a 0 score. Here is the solution! STOP TRYING TO SHOOT 70LBS! I dropped my poundage down to somewhere between 58- 6olbs. Drawing a bow with a hinge release with pressure only on the index finger is easy on light poundage; you will have no misfires, no busted mouth nor 0 scoring arrows. You can concentrate on aiming only. Then BANG! THE RELASE FIRES, AND YOU ABOUT PEE YOUR PANTS!!!
    If your going to shoot a hinge, this is how I would recommend doing it. Shoot light poundage with 65 % let off (or less) correct form, correct draw length, with the hinge set light! Light enough that you feel no travel prior to the release firing. This is only part of the answer to the solution. Unlike Allen Iverson, I feel you gotta practice. IMHO the blank bale is the place to start. You need to build muscle memory, learn to trust your aim, and let go, and diminish the fear of losing teeth.
    Okay you guys who read this and know me personally will call me a hypocrite and say,” Jerry you seldom shoot a hinge, you shoot an index finger release” and I do. I shoot a quickie 1 plus most of the time. I have two. One set with the heavy spring and the other set with the next to the heaviest spring. Both have zero travel. (Carter is the only index finger release that I have found that can be set heavy with no travel.) I think 0 travel is an absolute necessity for any trigger style release. If you own a release, and it has travel you need to do the following. You remove the travel, have the release manufacture correct it, or throw the thing away. Its going to do create more harm than good!
    Why do I shoot an index finger release? Simple! Because of the same question that Chris asked in his thread. I anchor more constantly with that style of release. However, I do not command it! I use back tension to shoot it. I place the trigger inside my big knuckle of my index finger (not at the tip !). After drawing, anchoring, and during aiming, I preload my trigger (make a hook) and pull with my right rhomboid. It fires with as much of a surprise as a hinge. I bought a carter squeeze me. Best product I have ever bought. The squeeze me taught me/helped me build the muscle memory and strength that I need to activate my quickie one release with back tension. Now, I shoot my quickie 1 accurately and consistently. The only person that I think shoots an index better than me is Michael Braden. Michael is awesome. (How great it would have been for an index finger shooter to win Vegas). And like me, Michael is primarily self-coached. We have learned a lot through trial and error.
    There are some pros that command or punch the release. Tim the Hammer Gillingham is currently the most famous. Tim believes that target panic/ anticipation is all in your head. It happens because you let it. Tom Crowe is a command release shooter. I also know two other pros (I don’t have permission to post their names) that have won Vegas (yes, men’s unlimited championship) that believe that squeezing/commanding is the correct way.

    So what is the correct way? Here is the answer! It’s going to vary between people. Some will be more successful shooting a hinge release set fast, some will need several hinge releases set at different speeds, and some will be more success full shooting an index or thumb (set heavy, no travel). I do think that the amount of archers that can command/punch consistently in pressure situations are few.

    I feel you need experiment, practice, and “pay your dues” to find what works, Most archers will need to master a subconscious release to experience success.

  2. #2
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    Jerry,

    Good post!, I pretty much agree with everything you wrote. However, as JCMorgan pointed out yesterday, some archers will do better with a subconscious aim and conscious release. Since I'm currently experiencing problems, I looked into this a little and it seems that some of the top coaches around are recommending the subconscious aim.

    There was something of a classic duel between the two methods a couple of years ago in the NFAA Indoor Nationals. The shootoff came down to Jesse Broadwater and Braden Galenthian. Jesse is a conscious aimer and Braden is a subconscious aimer. After all other archers were eliminated, it took Braden and Jesse 27 more arrows to decide the winner. While Braden, the subconscious aimer won, I don't think that this means that subconscious aiming is best for every archer. But is certainly demonstrates that it is a valid way to aim.

    There was also an article a few years ago in Archery Focus magazine by Rick McKinney that compared the two methods. Rick was on the US Olympic Team at the time when he first met archers in Europe using subconscious aiming. He said that the subconscious aimers seemed to do better in windy conditions and the conscious aimers did better when there was no wind.

    Is one method better than the other? For each individual archer, the answer is yes. But each archer has to make that decision. The more we know, the better the decision.

    On your point about different points of impact with a release set with different travel. The reason for this is partly due to the different amount of pressure that is put on the string which results in varying amounts of energy stored in the limbs. A recurve archer knows that the more they pull back, the more energy is stored in the limbs. It's a big deal with recurves, but much, much less with compounds. However, it is still a factor. Creep tuning will eliminate some of the up and down, but not the right and left. A second and larger part of this is that is changes your shoulder and arm alignment. This is where the lefts and rights come from. This is part of why Larry Wise recommends shooting from the middle of the vally. I used to think that Larry was off base on this since modern bows don't have much of a valley. But the more I learn, the more I understand the importance of consistent pressure on the string during execution of the shot.

    Thanks for starting this thread. I hope Dean posts his thoughts on this.

    Allen

  3. #3
    Jerry Whittington
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    Default

    I'd like to see more threads/ posts on how to help each other improve on this forum...let the bashing/ crap take place on "the other place"

  4. #4
    Senior Member Ancient Archer's Avatar
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    Default

    Great post. Can't comment since I'm new to the sport. However, very informative, especially since I've tried "playing" with the back tension release using my Tru-Fire mechanical trigger release. Will continue to try this method even though I don't have a "Back Tension Release" per se.

    By the way, of all the reading I've done so far, this is the first time I've read of a release referred to as a "hinge" release. Learn something every day, and that's a good thing!

    Once again: great post!
    "A Nation of Sheep Breeds a Government of Wolves!"
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by master Cleatus View Post
    I'd like to see more threads/ posts on how to help each other improve on this forum...let the bashing/ crap take place on "the other place"
    May I take you up on that?
    The lights went out and I'm in the dark!
    I'm shooting a thumb release (TRU Ball T handle Pro Diamond - standard head) and am trying to preload it so as to have back tension release the trigger. Am also fooling with the idea that if I VERY slightly pull my pinky in, I get more of a surprise release.
    Lately having trouble with target panic AND unemployment, so buying a new release is out!
    In beginner's terms, what is a hinge?
    You also mentioned 'travel' - could someone elaborate?
    What's the difference between 'conscious' and 'unconscious' aiming?
    One more. I have my release set at it's very lightest. You mentioned setting it just the oposite, which I will try.
    Thanks (good post btw)
    Sorry for all the dumb questions!
    Last edited by Lefteye; 12-31-2008 at 07:11 PM.
    That which is infinite cannot be many

  6. #6
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    Default

    In beginner's terms, what is a hinge?
    A release that is fired without a trigger. Instead it has a mechanism that is "hinged" and rotating the handle of the release allows it to fire.

    You also mentioned 'travel' - could someone elaborate?
    Travel means a couple different things depending on the type of release being used. On a triggered release, travel means the distance the trigger will move before firing. On a hinge release, it is the distance the handle will rotate before the hinge breaks free and fires.

    What's the difference between 'conscious' and 'unconscious' aiming?
    Conscious aiming means you are focusing on the target and actively trying to center your aiming indicator at its center. Your attention is on the target and you activate your release more from instinct and muscle memory than from an active thought process.

    Sub-consious aiming is where you aim at the target and they focus your thoughts on the realease to ensure your release is perfect. Your mind will put the pin in the center of the target. (like driving down the road. your mind keeps you in the center of the road while you sing Hannah Montana and think about what you're gonna order at McDonalds.....)

    Sorry for all the dumb questions!
    The only dumb questions are the ones you don't ask and the ones Slippy asks....

    Hope that helped.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Daniel Boone's Avatar
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    Default Nathan Brooks and Eric Griggs

    How they shoot BT. This is there comment. Some may or not agree but Nathan Brooks has won more than his share and so has Eric. Both high paid pros. Its just there thoughts I wanted to share with some here.
    DB

    I'll elaborate a little on what Dan is talking about here. To start with let me say that I strongly recomend setting a triggerless bt release with a good bit of travel. No disrespect to anyone who is successfull with a trigerless bt release and doesn't shoot this way, but I would say that virtually everyone at the top who is using a pure bt release is shooting it with travel. And...If your shooting it with travel you can not fire the release off back tension alone. You have to maintain back tension and that's important, but moving your hand and fingers is what makes that thing fire. The travel is important because it makes you stay active in the shot. You always keep pulling regardless of what the sight is doing. With a good bit of travel anticipation becomes a non-factor as well. For everyone who is shooting there release on the edge or have shot this in the past ask yourself this question. How many times have you been tenative with your release or had a hard time firing it in a pressure situation? Unless your lying to yourself this has happened to everyone who has shot a triggerless bt release set up light or with the clicker. Not to say it can't happen when you set them up with travel, but you know that you have to get after the release to make it fire so it forces you to be aggressive. I'll give you a great example of this. Nathan Brooks was in the shootoff in Vegas last year and let down after holding for a really long time. He got rid of the release in his hand and got a different one. After the fact I asked him what the deal was and he said he switched to a HEAVIER release. I was suprised at first, but when he explained it to me it made perfect sense. He was having problems getting it to fire and he knew once he swithed to something with even more travel that it would force him to be aggressive to get the release to fire. I know that this isn't going to work for everyone, but the topic came up so I figured I would add my thoughts.


    Eric
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    If you want to read a little more go here. I hope in 09 to bring more threads like this here.

    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...=Nathan+Brooks
    Last edited by Daniel Boone; 12-31-2008 at 11:07 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Everyone one is going to have their own opinion on what’s the most common and correct method of back tension and thats ok

    DB
    Here’s a post I made earlier today on a hinge thread that would follow the same principles as Eric’s thread

    My quote today

    Setting it up so that its fires without much effort – “hairy” works for a while but usually tends to make a person anticipate the shot , builds paranoia over miss fires while drawing back or letting down and causes some shots to be premature - firing very quick while settling in on the – X.

    When setting up a Hinge that has more travel or hang time while pulling thru the shots helps a person stay stronger thru the aiming process of the shot thus helping one from having a “weak shot – pre-relaxing of the muscles while still aiming” Versus staying strong and somewhat stable.

    You will see at times when some of us are under pressure in a shoot off where we have to let down because of the shot not going off as wanted “we will then switch to a harder release ( more travel needed before it breaks” in order to stay stronger in that high pressure shot thus scoring better under pressure. Most people think that we are switching to an easier firing release when actually it’s the opposite.

    I hope some of this helps




    And not to pick a fight I believe old Cletus here stated in that hinge thread today that he smacked himself in the face with his light set release, sorry to hear that I hope the hesitation and paranoia of not trusting the release doesn’t set in on you.

    Good luck my freind

    Jeff
    The only one that is your competitor is the air between your ears!



  9. #9
    Bisquit....... BowhuntnHoosier's Avatar
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    Just my .02...............but how about drive-by shooting????? Thats my way.


    "HONDA"

  10. #10
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    Default Hinge Release

    Listen up! This is gospel folks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Boone View Post
    How they shoot BT. This is there comment. Some may or not agree but Nathan Brooks has won more than his share and so has Eric. Both high paid pros. Its just there thoughts I wanted to share with some here.
    DB

    I'll elaborate a little on what Dan is talking about here. To start with let me say that I strongly recomend setting a triggerless bt release with a good bit of travel. No disrespect to anyone who is successfull with a trigerless bt release and doesn't shoot this way, but I would say that virtually everyone at the top who is using a pure bt release is shooting it with travel. And...If your shooting it with travel you can not fire the release off back tension alone. You have to maintain back tension and that's important, but moving your hand and fingers is what makes that thing fire. The travel is important because it makes you stay active in the shot. You always keep pulling regardless of what the sight is doing. With a good bit of travel anticipation becomes a non-factor as well. For everyone who is shooting there release on the edge or have shot this in the past ask yourself this question. How many times have you been tenative with your release or had a hard time firing it in a pressure situation? Unless your lying to yourself this has happened to everyone who has shot a triggerless bt release set up light or with the clicker. Not to say it can't happen when you set them up with travel, but you know that you have to get after the release to make it fire so it forces you to be aggressive. I'll give you a great example of this. Nathan Brooks was in the shootoff in Vegas last year and let down after holding for a really long time. He got rid of the release in his hand and got a different one. After the fact I asked him what the deal was and he said he switched to a HEAVIER release. I was suprised at first, but when he explained it to me it made perfect sense. He was having problems getting it to fire and he knew once he swithed to something with even more travel that it would force him to be aggressive to get the release to fire. I know that this isn't going to work for everyone, but the topic came up so I figured I would add my thoughts.


    Eric
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    If you want to read a little more go here. I hope in 09 to bring more threads like this here.

    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...=Nathan+Brooks
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  11. #11
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    Default Inny tighty?

    OK, so I forgot everything!
    I've got a TRU Ball release, which way to turn the adjustment screw for lighter/harder release?
    That which is infinite cannot be many

  12. #12
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefteye View Post
    OK, so I forgot everything!
    I've got a TRU Ball release, which way to turn the adjustment screw for lighter/harder release?
    Which one you have?
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    TRU Ball t-handle pro diamond
    http://www.lancasterarchery.com/inde...sort=3a&page=3
    Fourth one down

    And thanks for clearing up the terminology for me - I appreciate that.
    So there are 3 different types of release? - trigger,hinge and true BT? - is that right?
    Last edited by Lefteye; 01-01-2009 at 04:59 PM.
    That which is infinite cannot be many

  14. #14
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefteye View Post
    TRU Ball t-handle pro diamond
    http://www.lancasterarchery.com/inde...sort=3a&page=3
    Fourth one down

    And thanks for clearing up the terminology for me - I appreciate that.
    So there are 3 different types of release? - trigger,hinge and true BT? - is that right?
    To me, "back tension" is more of a shooting style than a type of release. You can use "back tension" methods with a trigger. That clear it up for you?
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    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefteye View Post
    So there are 3 different types of release? - trigger,hinge and true BT? - is that right?
    The three main types of release available today are hinge, thumb, and wrist.

    As JC posted they can all be shot using back tension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcmorgan31 View Post
    WOW! - more than I expected!
    Ask and you shall recieve.
    Thanks so much. ..put it in 'favorites' 'til I memorize it.
    One last time. There are releases that you do not twist or turn or nothin', you just pull until a spring compresses and off she goes. I thought that that is what I'm calling a pure BT release.
    Last edited by Lefteye; 01-01-2009 at 08:35 PM.
    That which is infinite cannot be many

  18. #18
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    Default my troubles

    everything all of you have said makes sense even though it totally contradicts another opinion that makes a lot of sense. here is my problem, i have been at this for months:

    if i set a hinge light, i get it to fire truly using ONLY back tension and it is a nice crisp surprise release. i am very accurate BUT.. i am only shooting at 5-6yards rght now until i ge this perfected. the problem is, it only takes 1 or 2 seconds to fire. and that is way to short. i would lke about 5-6 seconds. when i shoot like that i totally have to agree with Bernie Pellerite about setting them off with back tension only but i can't get it to take 4 seconds in which to really aim hard.

    now

    if i set the hinge up with any travel, it takes so mucg squeezing to get it to fre wthout "cheating the release" by using my arm and hand to pull. with all that pulling if i stick with the shot, by the time it let's go, my pin is all over and i am anticipating the hell out of the shot right to the milisecond.also i tend to let my release arm creep forward trying to keep tension out of it. even if i can stick with it, any travel i feel means the surprise is gone bye bye.

    why can't i slow it down some with no travel and...

    why do i have to squeeze so hard it get it to fire when there is any travel?

    help me PLEASE.lol

    i just want to get a nice shot routine down in which it takws about 4 seconds to activate a release so i can actually feel like an archer who goes and shoots a bow.

    and as far as hinges go. slight ajustments mean a lot when it comes to travel, am i correct?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortarrow View Post
    everything all of you have said makes sense even though it totally contradicts another opinion that makes a lot of sense. here is my problem, i have been at this for months:

    if i set a hinge light, i get it to fire truly using ONLY back tension and it is a nice crisp surprise release. i am very accurate BUT.. i am only shooting at 5-6yards rght now until i ge this perfected. the problem is, it only takes 1 or 2 seconds to fire. and that is way to short. i would lke about 5-6 seconds. when i shoot like that i totally have to agree with Bernie Pellerite about setting them off with back tension only but i can't get it to take 4 seconds in which to really aim hard.

    now

    if i set the hinge up with any travel, it takes so mucg squeezing to get it to fre wthout "cheating the release" by using my arm and hand to pull. with all that pulling if i stick with the shot, by the time it let's go, my pin is all over and i am anticipating the hell out of the shot right to the milisecond.also i tend to let my release arm creep forward trying to keep tension out of it. even if i can stick with it, any travel i feel means the surprise is gone bye bye.

    why can't i slow it down some with no travel and...

    why do i have to squeeze so hard it get it to fire when there is any travel?

    help me PLEASE.lol

    i just want to get a nice shot routine down in which it takws about 4 seconds to activate a release so i can actually feel like an archer who goes and shoots a bow.

    and as far as hinges go. slight ajustments mean a lot when it comes to travel, am i correct?

    SA,

    This could be a few things. The first you should look at is your draw length. When I had similar problems, shortening my DL helped.
    Another thing is your bow shoulder. Sometime it will creep up on you and effectively shorten your DL
    A third thing is the release adjustment. Like JDX posted if it is too quick, it makes us hesitant and hesitation is something to be avoided.

    Something that I'm going through right now is that I can execute good shots in practice, but when I tense up during competition, I have trouble with hesitation and my scores really show it. A release with more travel will probably help. I'll know after league tonight.

    Allen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
    SA,

    This could be a few things. The first you should look at is your draw length. When I had similar problems, shortening my DL helped.
    Another thing is your bow shoulder. Sometime it will creep up on you and effectively shorten your DL
    A third thing is the release adjustment. Like JDX posted if it is too quick, it makes us hesitant and hesitation is something to be avoided.

    Something that I'm going through right now is that I can execute good shots in practice, but when I tense up during competition, I have trouble with hesitation and my scores really show it. A release with more travel will probably help. I'll know after league tonight.

    Allen
    This is so because you are not relaxed. Set the pressure in you back and keep it there. Relax everything else and slowly add more pressure in your back. BAM!! And its clean. I have shortened the response and I hope you get what Im trying to say.

    CS

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