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  1. #1
    Junior Member hutchies's Avatar
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    Default Machined VS Cast Risers..............

    I know this is being debated all over right now with Hoyt's new Turbohawk they just put out. I don't think that they would risk their reputation on a product they feld was inferior. I knwo we have alot of very knowledgable shooters and tuners on here and wanted to hear what you had to say.

  2. #2
    Junior Member okoutlaw's Avatar
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    I have shot both ( Turbo-AM) the buzz after the shot is all i have noticed on the AM with the Turbo there was nothing? I don't think Hoyt would put anything out that would jeopardize there reputation for having one of the toughest bows on the market. That Turbo is gonna sell and the ones that shoot it will cry if they already bought that BIG $ AM!!

    If they release a Turbo in 35 ATA its all over for the AM 35!!....

  3. #3
    Junior Member hutchies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okoutlaw View Post
    That Turbo is gonna sell and the ones that shoot it will cry if they already bought that BIG $ AM!!

    If they release a Turbo in 35 ATA its all over for the AM 35!!....


    Exactly what I said...............They come out with a Turbo 35 and I fo sho know what my next bow will be. It maybe a Turbomax soon enough anyway. Alot of people are gonna argue that the cast riser tolerances are not as tight and that casting can have flaws..................the flaws are true but very rare. I don't know one person that has ever had a cast riser break on them.

  4. #4
    Senior Member JAVI's Avatar
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    you couldn't give me a CAST riser, they're subject to voids and we've been down this road before...

    but I have no knowledge of the Hoyt whatca'ma'callit
    Mike "Javi" Cooper

  5. #5
    Junior Member hutchies's Avatar
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    Javi you were one of the guys I was hoping would weigh in on this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutchies View Post
    Javi you were one of the guys I was hoping would weigh in on this.
    The cast risers have been out a lot longer than the machined risers. They had some problems with them back in the day. We all know that but with todays technology I beleive the cast risers a definatly better than they used to be. With that being said I know that Hoyt would not have put this bow line out if they thought it was that much inferior.

    I shot the turbo hawk and I was definatly impressed. The only difference I could find was the riser and the price tag.

    I really think Hoyt did a great thing. Now they are competitive on the lower dollar bows.

  7. #7
    Senior Member JAVI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jame View Post
    The cast risers have been out a lot longer than the machined risers. They had some problems with them back in the day. We all know that but with todays technology I beleive the cast risers a definatly better than they used to be. With that being said I know that Hoyt would not have put this bow line out if they thought it was that much inferior.

    I shot the turbo hawk and I was definatly impressed. The only difference I could find was the riser and the price tag.

    I really think Hoyt did a great thing. Now they are competitive on the lower dollar bows.
    Are they actually form cast or is it billet. I deal with this type of thing for a living...
    Mike "Javi" Cooper

  8. #8
    Junior Member hutchies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GCOD View Post
    Actually they are not totally cast,they are using mim technology( metal injection molding).They get a rough riser after the mim process and then machine it to the finished product.

    I don't know jack about casting...........for those of you that do this may help. Jame I think they did do a great job and if I had the $500 I would probably be holding one...............we rigged up the 70 lber at the shop last night and shot it side by side with the 70 lb Alpha after you left. Out of the 3 guys that shot them side by side we all thought the Turbo was quieter and shot just as well as the Alpha 32.

  9. #9
    Junior Member hutchies's Avatar
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    Metal injection molding or (MIM) is a manufacturing process which combines the versatility of plastic injection molding with the strength and integrity of machined, pressed or otherwise manufactured small, complex, metal parts. Competing processes include pressed powder sintering, investment casting, turning and machining.

    The process involves combining fine metal powders with plastic binders which allow the metal to be injected into a mold using equipment similar to standard plastic injection molding machines. After the part is molded and before the binders are removed, the part is referred to as a 'green part'. The next step is to remove the binders with solvents and thermal processes. The resultant metal part is sintered at temperatures great enough to bind the particles but not melt the metal. The products of metal injection molding are up to 98% as dense as wrought iron and used in a broad range of applications (including medical, dental, firearms, aerospace, and automotive.)

    The window of economic advantage in metal injection molded parts lies in the complexity and small size of the part. Tolerances as small as +/-.003" per linear inch can usually be held without secondary processes. The difficulty of fabrication through other means may make it inefficient or even impossible to manufacture otherwise. Increasing complexity for traditional manufacturing methods typically does not increase cost in a metal injection molding operation due to the wide range of features possible through injection molding (internal and external threads, miniaturization, branding).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVI View Post
    Are they actually form cast or is it billet. I deal with this type of thing for a living...
    Shoot brother, You got me.

  11. #11
    Senior Member JAVI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutchies View Post
    Metal injection molding or (MIM) is a manufacturing process which combines the versatility of plastic injection molding with the strength and integrity of machined, pressed or otherwise manufactured small, complex, metal parts. Competing processes include pressed powder sintering, investment casting, turning and machining.

    The process involves combining fine metal powders with plastic binders which allow the metal to be injected into a mold using equipment similar to standard plastic injection molding machines. After the part is molded and before the binders are removed, the part is referred to as a 'green part'. The next step is to remove the binders with solvents and thermal processes. The resultant metal part is sintered at temperatures great enough to bind the particles but not melt the metal. The products of metal injection molding are up to 98% as dense as wrought iron and used in a broad range of applications (including medical, dental, firearms, aerospace, and automotive.)

    The window of economic advantage in metal injection molded parts lies in the complexity and small size of the part. Tolerances as small as +/-.003" per linear inch can usually be held without secondary processes. The difficulty of fabrication through other means may make it inefficient or even impossible to manufacture otherwise. Increasing complexity for traditional manufacturing methods typically does not increase cost in a metal injection molding operation due to the wide range of features possible through injection molding (internal and external threads, miniaturization, branding).
    We use some MIM in our shop.. they are not as prone to voids as the typical sand cast parts..
    Mike "Javi" Cooper

  12. #12
    At least I admit Im Crazy Looney Bin's Avatar
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    I still have a Hoyt Ultramag which had a cast magnesium riser. Not sure which way of casting was used to produce this pertiucular riser. I've never had a problem with it. Very solid bow. However I know of and have seen the aftermath of a few older cast risers that came apart on shooters at full draw. I would imagine Hoyt has thought this out. Sure enough, if the make enough of them, one will probally fail and I'm sure a pic will pop up somewhere.
    Of all the things I lost I miss my mind the Most!?!?!?


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