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  1. #1
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    Default On a 60-70 lb. bow, does 60 lb. work well?

    Howdy folks,
    I'm looking for a new bow and I see quite a few that are 60 to 70 lb. and I'm thinking that 60-62 will be right in my comfort zone and I'm wondering, does a 60-70 shoot well in the 60-low 60's range or does it need to be closer to 70 to perform well?

    Maybe a silly question but it seems to be the way my bow works. It shot terribly when I turned it down and shot progressively better as I turned it up.

    Thanks in advance,
    Pat

  2. #2
    JBK BOWSTRINS,DCAP staff armyof1's Avatar
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    it realy depends on your arrow setup and your rest on the bow use the rite arrow for the draw weight and a drop away rest and you shouldnt have any problems

  3. #3
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    from my experience... the bow will always shoot better when it is bottomed out... meaning if you want to shoot 60lbs... I would get a 50-60lb bow...

    Just my 2 cents worth...
    Last edited by mathewsgirl13; 11-10-2009 at 11:39 AM.
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  4. #4
    Junior Member Lobotomy's Avatar
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    Any bow will perform well within their spec, just make sure your arrow is the right weight. Lighter the faster.
    PSE X-Force Dream Season '08, PSE Prowler drop away,
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  5. #5
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    I think what the guys are saying is that bows do perform better when shot at their highest draw weight. That doesn't mean they will shoot badly turned down. Afterall, that's one of the reasons there are limb bolts on the bow. If it were meant to be shot at just the highest setting then the limbs could be fitted into a stationary limb pocket and be done with it.

    This is just an eduacted guess about your present bow, but a reason it may have shot better as you turned it up is that the arrow spine did not match the lower draw weight setting or you didn't have it tuned as well at that setting.

    Still, if I were you, planning on shooting in the low 60's then I'd get a bow that goes to 60#. Most will make a couple pounds past that and if it doesn't it can always be tweaked a bit to get it. In the long run you'll find it easier to shoot the lighter weight and your shoulders will last a few years longer as you get older. Besides, there is no game animal on the North American continent that 60# or so won't handle.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks for the info. folks,
    It's as I feared. lol There's a whole lot more bows at good prices in the 60-70 range than in the 50-60 range.

    Oh well, I'm hooked now. I'll just have to bite the bullet and hand over the plastic. I just have to figure out whether I want a 32" Axle to Axle or a 35". Allen has given me some really good points on why the 35" with a 30" draw will be nicer to handle than a 32" at 30" and they're being taken into consideration but some of the 32's are calling. lol

    Gotta love the hunt!! Whether it's for a Moose or a new bow, it's thrilling as heck.

    Thanks,
    Pat

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patsplace View Post
    Thanks for the info. folks,
    It's as I feared. lol There's a whole lot more bows at good prices in the 60-70 range than in the 50-60 range.

    Oh well, I'm hooked now. I'll just have to bite the bullet and hand over the plastic. I just have to figure out whether I want a 32" Axle to Axle or a 35". Allen has given me some really good points on why the 35" with a 30" draw will be nicer to handle than a 32" at 30" and they're being taken into consideration but some of the 32's are calling. lol

    Gotta love the hunt!! Whether it's for a Moose or a new bow, it's thrilling as heck.

    Thanks,
    Pat
    You shouldn't have to pay more to get a 60# bow. All the models come in different poundages. Maybe your just having a harder time finding a 60# in the stores. That may be a good thing. It might mean that people are starting to wise up to the fact that they don't need to ruin their shoulder joints to shoot something the size of deer.

    As for length, I would shoot both lengths, but even with a 26.5" to 27" draw, being 5'8" tall, I lean toward longer bows just because of the fit and string angle. If you want to touch the tip of your nose to the string it's much easier to do so with the longer bow without having to increase the draw length beyond what would be optimum for you. I just ordered an Rytera Alien Z at 36" ATA, for instance.

    Believe me, that 3 extra inches isn't much. It's 1 1/2" at each end of the bow and the longer riser may add a few more ounces, but the longer bow will be easier to shoot accurately and be more stable. A bow doesn't have to be super short to be maneuverable.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathewsgirl13 View Post
    from my experience... the bow will always shoot better when it is bottomed out... meaning if you want to shoot 60lbs... I would get a 50-60lb bow...

    Just my 2 cents worth...
    That is my opinion as well, I can shoot over 60 but prefer to just shoot a 60lb pull to keep the bolts tightened down. The bow should be quitier and should be easier to keep in time.
    Mountain Outdoors Shooter

  9. #9
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    I guess a lot of it has to do with what you want to accomplish, In the world of known distance outdoor archery a lot of folks shot day in and out with bows backed out some, Even years ago Dave C. would shoot the Hoyts backed out a bunch.

    For hunting many folks have entered the woods with bows backed out and one of my favorite killer setups is a 70 lb Prestige backed down to 63 pounds.

    In the world of high-end 3D competition, then yes to milk every ounce of energy and speed out of a bow, having the bow maxed out is a common sight.


    Just my opinion

    Jeff Heeg
    The only one that is your competitor is the air between your ears!



  10. #10
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    Your bow will always shoot better at its highest weight that is what the manufactuar does all thier testing at. However if you have the right arrow weight and tip weight you your kinetic energy should be fine. If you havent already check out cameron hanes backcountry bowhunting book. It goes into some really good formulas for arrow weight and kinetic energy.

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  11. #11
    Guest Carpshooter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Good info here !

    Quote Originally Posted by WCH View Post
    That is my opinion as well, I can shoot over 60 but prefer to just shoot a 60lb pull to keep the bolts tightened down. The bow should be quitier and should be easier to keep in time.
    I got three hunting bows ,2 =60 lbs. max @ 1=70 lbs max ,I shoot at around 60 lds ,the 70 lbs. turn down has more noise !

  12. #12
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    I prefer the 60# maxed as opposed to the 70# backed off, also. I keep my Hoyt Vectrix well tuned. I get 63# max. out of mine. With today's high tec bows, KE isn't even an issue for me anymore, for deer. I shoot nearly the lightest arrow I can, safely. I believe it leaves the deer less time to move, resulting in better shot placement. I almost always get complete pass throughs with a 325 grain Victory vforce HV 350 at 297 fps. and a 29 1/2" draw length. So far, I've killed 10 deer with this bow. I did notice more ease of movement, especially in straight down shots from my treestand, when I swiched to the 33" ATA Vectrix from the 36" ATA Ultra Mag. I've had no problem touching my nose to the string with either model. There are a few models out there shooting 350 to 360 fps. Depending on draw length and arrow weight, one should be able to shoot close to 300 fps at a 50# draw weight. My next bow will probably be one of those super fast models set to 50#. I'm 50 and I like to shoot nearly every day. I hope to be able to shoot as long as I can without ruining my shoulders. Have fun, I do.

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