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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    137

    Default Getting a new bow, need help

    I'm getting a new bow in the next few months and I need some help and advice. I'm leaning toward Bowtech/Diamond & Hoyt, but not locked into either. I'd like to stay around $700 for the bare bow, knowing that I'll have to put a couple hundred into accessories. So here are a few questions I have:

    Are the Hoyt cams slaved like they are on Bowtechs? If I can avoid having to mess with timing cams, I'd rather.

    Is there any advantage to dual cams over singles? I've read here and elsewhere that duals are a bit faster, but that's not my major concern.

    One thing I'm wrestling with is where to buy the darn thing. I do want to support my local shop, but there sure are some sweet deals out there. A new-in-the-box General just sold on eBay for about $600, for example. But if it takes $200 or so to have my shop help set it up, the deal's not so sweet, is it? Further, I'd feel like a hole if I took my pro's time to shoot some bows at his shop and then bought elsewhere.

  2. #2

    Default

    the best way would be to start by going around to several bow shops and trying all.

    lots of the guys trade in and or up on a yearly cycle. You may find a good used bow that can save you some bucks.

    do not be set on one brand and see what feels the best in your hand and what shoots the best based on your style..

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Buy it from a pro shop

    My 2 daughters shoot Diamond Razor's Edge bows - their first bows and they have performed great - for first bows. I had the necessity to contact Bowtech about some concerns and I was really impressed about their customer service - but...I cannot stress how important it is to get a bow from a pro shop. I made the mistake of buying my first bow and my daughters bows from sporting goods stores and my second online. Fortunately, the owner of the shop that we shoot at only charged for the components that we swapped out and purchased from him (e.g. rest, sight, wrist sling, properly adding the d-loop, correcting everything that the sporting good store had done wrong - It's a learning experience) rather than for full tuning/set up, which are free when you purchase from him. He once commented to me, they sold you what they had, not what you needed. My ultra-elite came from him - our next bows will be from a proshop - Specifically from Jim@ Indian Creek Archery. If you think about it this way... Say you are going to spend $600 for a bow on line. Now, lets ship it - at least $25-50, get it set up, etc... Where are you going to shoot it, buy components, get it repaired, etc..? Probably at the proshop. If you walk into most shops and tell them your budget and what you are considering - online purchase, etc... they will steer you towards something that is fit for you - even if it is a bit more than it would cost you online - it is worth it - because you are also buying into their expertise and that can be priceless. If the shop you are working with is not like that - not willing to give you a tip, make an uncharged minor adjustment, etc... SWITCH SHOPS. I have never met a good shop owner that is in this just for the money. I get long winded and bounce all of the place, don't I?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Daniel Boone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    6,934

    Default Classifiads bow

    Quote Originally Posted by MTColl28734 View Post
    I'm getting a new bow in the next few months and I need some help and advice. I'm leaning toward Bowtech/Diamond & Hoyt, but not locked into either. I'd like to stay around $700 for the bare bow, knowing that I'll have to put a couple hundred into accessories. So here are a few questions I have:

    Are the Hoyt cams slaved like they are on Bowtechs? If I can avoid having to mess with timing cams, I'd rather.

    Is there any advantage to dual cams over singles? I've read here and elsewhere that duals are a bit faster, but that's not my major concern.

    One thing I'm wrestling with is where to buy the darn thing. I do want to support my local shop, but there sure are some sweet deals out there. A new-in-the-box General just sold on eBay for about $600, for example. But if it takes $200 or so to have my shop help set it up, the deal's not so sweet, is it? Further, I'd feel like a hole if I took my pro's time to shoot some bows at his shop and then bought elsewhere.
    Most pro shops will set any bow up you bring into the shop. If they dont drive and find another. You can save alot of money buying on AT classifiads, and Ebay at times. But go to a few pro shops. You might be surprised how they might set you up, call and ask what they charge to set one up. Pays to drive and shop around. Dont be afraid to ask questions. If your buying a used bow, purchase a few assc from the local dealer for the bow. Hoyt has proven to be a great quality bow over the years. Dont think you will be dissapointed with a Hoyt.
    DB
    Elite bows, Vortex Binos, Trophy Taker sights, Carter releases, Goldtip Arrows. CBE sights, Vapor Trail Strings, B Stinger stabilizers

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