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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2007
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    Default need help on beginners equipment

    Hi everyone,

    I'm about as new as one can get with all of this. My husband and I would like to start learning archery with our three kids (5, 7, and 8). We have a club about an hour from us that we're going to join to learn the basics and begin to practice at their site. Right now, we would like to focus on target archery while our kids are still young, but would like to hunt in the future when they are older and our target skills and strength increase.

    We've been told by one of the instructors at the local club that a Genesis bow would do us all good to start out on. Do you all agree? We'd like to keep the cost low at this point to ensure that everyone enjoys the sport. We plan to upgrade in the future, but were told that this bow would be a good option as we could all use it.

    Obviously, we will need some other items I would appreciate anyone's advice on what's the minimum we need to get started, and what other items we might like to look into getting as well. Are there any special items needed for the younger ones (i.e. safety guards etc.)?

    Thanks so much for your help!

  2. #2
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    The Genesis would be good in that all of you could shoot the same bow. That being said, your husband is not going to want to shoot the same poundage as your youngest. You definitely will not want to be adjusting draw poundage all the time.

    If you are wanting to concentrate on target archery, you are going to want to develop good habits to begin with. The Genesis bow does not have a draw stop on it (unless you buy the Pro model) and therefore it would be very difficult to develop a good release execution without a draw stop to pull against. I think very bad habits would be developed with a genesis bow.

    My 5 and 7 year olds share a mini-genesis. It is a great bow for them to begin with and not too terribly expensive to start out with. I would consider getting the 8yr old something more like a real compound bow. I would definitely suggest you and your husband getting adult sized bows. You can find good used bows for really good prices in the classifieds here and on archerytalk.com.

    There are a lot of different types of sights, rests and releases out there. You don't have to buy the most expensive, latest and greatest stuff to get a feel for archery and have a good time. If you have questions about these things feel free to start a thread on here and I know you will get a lot of great advice....
    Pathfinder Arrow Wraps

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2007
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    Default

    Thanks for the quick reply.

    We haven't even went to the store to "hold" a bow yet, so forgive me if this is a stupid question. Is it really a pain to adjust them?

    Would all three kids be ok on the genesis? All three are very tall for their age and pretty tough kids. I honestly think the mini might be too small for them, or at least wouldn't last them long with a 6 to 12 lb draw weight. They are all 4 ft and over (literally off the growth charts for their ages). I've read on another post that someone put their own draw stop on. Would that be possible?

    If my husband and I got ourselves a bow, is there something that we could both use at first that wouldn't run us much? Or would the pro line be appropriate for us to start? I'd say I'm quite a bit above the average strength for a female, but I do have carpal tunnel syndrome in both wrists so I don't know if that would affect my ability to draw more weight. I'd like to keep the purchase to no more than two bows for the family until we are positive this is something the kids will even want to do. We recently donated the hardly used set of bowling equipment we wasted our money on last year.

    We most likely won't be hunting until a few years from now, when we move. Although there are plenty of places around us to hunt, I don't feel comfortable taking the youngest out for awhile....besides....they're all too noisy at this point to hunt for anything. They all need to learn to more about the "art" of hunting first

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2007
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    Joining a club would be a great idea. Wish you had one closer. Some, ours included, have supervised shoots weekly for children, with certified instructors. That's a luxury hard to beat.
    Safety is very important to instill, and supervision is absolutely required. Lock them up when supervised use is not going on.
    At those ages children don't have the coordination to do everything right with shooting a bow. teach basics, but don't expect them to put everything together. They will grow into it as they develop with age, and the body and brain develop.

  5. #5
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    We haven't even went to the store to "hold" a bow yet, so forgive me if this is a stupid question. Is it really a pain to adjust them?
    Some bows have adjustable draw lengths, some don't. Usually, adjusting the draw length is not that difficult as long as you have bought a bow that is adjustable through your draw range. If you need new draw modules or a new cam, then it might become a little tricky. Adjusting draw weight is easy. You just turn the bolts that hold the limbs in the limb pockets. However, it is important to turn them the same and also to realize that by changing the poundage, you will have to resight the bow in.

    Would all three kids be ok on the genesis? All three are very tall for their age and pretty tough kids. I honestly think the mini might be too small for them, or at least wouldn't last them long with a 6 to 12 lb draw weight. They are all 4 ft and over (literally off the growth charts for their ages). I've read on another post that someone put their own draw stop on. Would that be possible?
    I would say yes. They should all be able to use a genesis just fine. As far as adding a draw stop, the cam is plastic and could be drilled, however the three boys will all have different draw lengths and the stop would do more harm then good. If you are wanting them to share one, I wouldn't worry about the draw stop. Let them shoot and see if they take to it and maybe get them something else later on.

    If my husband and I got ourselves a bow, is there something that we could both use at first that wouldn't run us much?
    If you bought the pro model, you would either have to change the draw stop every time you guys shoot the bow or else set it for you husband and not use one yourself. I don't know much about them, but you might look at recurves. Maybe someone else has a better idea on this one.

    We most likely won't be hunting until a few years from now, when we move. Although there are plenty of places around us to hunt, I don't feel comfortable taking the youngest out for awhile....besides....they're all too noisy at this point to hunt for anything. They all need to learn to more about the "art" of hunting first
    Well, you definitely don't have to hunt to enjoy archery. Take your time with it and get the family comfortable with it. Then you can enjoy some of the best "up close and personal" hunting you could ever imagine...
    Pathfinder Arrow Wraps

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    Thanks again, so much, for the help.

    We do have a club that's up here on our mesa, but it's at a gun shooting range and costs over twice what the other does. It's also not used much for archery, so they don't really have a lot of members that are active with that.

    In the next town over, an hour away, there's a true and active club with 100 acres. When you join, they give you the keys to the gate to access any time and on Weds they meet up for a 3D shoot, and a BBQ. There's several certified trainers there that said that they would be happy to give us all classes for free on Saturdays. We just can't pass that deal up, even if there is a long drive. That's the town we have to go do our shopping and such in anyway, so it's not that big of a deal to us.

    We'd just like to keep the cost the down at first, and then over time we can replace items with more expensive ones. Little less of a shock to the wallet that way

    As far as other equipment is concerned, besides arrows and a target, what is necessary and what is luxury? Also, is there a difference between arrow types for target shooting and hunting, and if so, which type of target type arrows should we look for?

  7. #7
    Prodigal Son jcmorgan31's Avatar
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    My local club is similar as they give us a key to the gate and we can go in any time. That really makes it worth it as busy as we all seem to be these days.

    Unless you are a serious target archer, there are plenty of arrows that can be used for both hunting and shooting at targets. Make sure you get arrows that are sized correctly for the poundage you are shooting. Aluminum arrows are less expensive and can easily be used for both.

    Necessities would include a sight, arrow rest and a release. There are a lot of opinions as to which brand is better than which other brand.

    Cobra makes affordable sights that are affordable. I myself would look for a sight in the classifieds first. Pin sights are fine and are used the most when hunting. If you want to work towards hunting, then getting used to shooting with pins would be an added plus. My personal favorite brand are the Copper John sights and they can be found for pretty reasonable prices in the classifieds.

    There are about a billion rests out there. The simplest and in my opinion best hunting rest is the Whisker Biscuit made by Carolina Archery Products. They are simple and practical and accurate enough.

    Same goes for releases. There are a lot of different ones out there. The majority of target archers use "t" handle type releases. Most hunters I know use wrist strap releases. Best thing to do there is find a place where you can try a few different types and see what feels the best.
    Pathfinder Arrow Wraps

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