Archery Forums 3DShoots.com
Find Archery Shoots near you  |   Advertise on 3DShoots.com

Go Back   Archery Forums 3DShoots.com > Archery Forum > Beginners Archery Range
 

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-06-2010, 01:21 AM   #1
Talgoran
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2
Talgoran is on a distinguished road
Default Random questions from a novice!

Hi all! I'm a novice archer in need of some answers to some simple questions. I'd really appreciate any help you could give, I know some of the people in this forum are really knowledgeable (I've browsed). Just for background, I shoot a 25 lb. bare recurve. It's 66 or 68 inches...a "Mohegan Adult" bow from Greatree Archery. I've had it for about two years and it's doing fine.

1) Is my bow waterproof? I believe it's laminated...it's got a sheen on it. I would guess it is, but obviously I'd like to get a second opinion before I go shoot with it in the rain.

2) I'm thinking of trying to do some bowhunting later on. To my understanding, if you're going to hunt whitetail deer with a bow, you use a compound bow. So I was thinking...if I practice solely with a recurve barebow, will it be very hard for me to accustom to a large draw-weight compound bow with stabilizers and sights and all that? Do people generally make the transition well?


3) How do I know when I have achieved the max draw length or whatever it is called? I mean, if the arrow isn't pulled backward off the shelf, what's stopping me from pulling the string way back past my jaw (assuming I have a good anchor point) for maximum power? I assume it's bad to overdraw the bow, and it somehow results in loss of accuracy or something? I don't get it.

4) Breathing. I've heard different things from different people, and I'm not sure what the 'best' way is. Should I just breathe evenly as I draw and shoot, and pretty much ignore the issue? Should I inhale as I draw, then exhale while releasing tension in my string fingers? Or another method? What do you guys suggest?

Sorry if any of these questions are amazingly naive haha. Any responses would be great!
Talgoran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 02:07 PM   #2
Too Many Hobbies
Senior Member
 
Too Many Hobbies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 104
Too Many Hobbies is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talgoran View Post
1) Is my bow waterproof? I believe it's laminated...it's got a sheen on it. I would guess it is, but obviously I'd like to get a second opinion before I go shoot with it in the rain.
Your bow is more water resistant than water proof. You can definately shoot in the rain, though I would suggest you avoid downpours. The caviat to this is that as soon as you get out of the rain you need to make sure to get your bow dried off quuckly with a good soft cloth. Also inspect it to make sure that it is not de-laminating. You need to be waxing your string as well at a bare minimium of 1x a month, and if you are shooting more, then more often.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talgoran View Post
2) I'm thinking of trying to do some bowhunting later on. To my understanding, if you're going to hunt whitetail deer with a bow, you use a compound bow. So I was thinking...if I practice solely with a recurve barebow, will it be very hard for me to accustom to a large draw-weight compound bow with stabilizers and sights and all that? Do people generally make the transition well?
You do not need a compound in order to hunt whitetail unless it is required by law in your state; however, you will need to get a bow with greater draw weight (how much once again depends upon your state, for example CO requires at least 40lbs for hunting). Also, if you do decide to get a compound you do not need to get a 70-80lb bow. I personally hunt with a 65 lb bow and unless I just nail a bone dead-on I tend to get pass throughs. As far as transitioning from recurve to compound it is relatively easy. Good form is good form no matter what equipment you are shooting. The biggest transition you will have is aiming and the higher draw weight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talgoran View Post
3) How do I know when I have achieved the max draw length or whatever it is called? I mean, if the arrow isn't pulled backward off the shelf, what's stopping me from pulling the string way back past my jaw (assuming I have a good anchor point) for maximum power? I assume it's bad to overdraw the bow, and it somehow results in loss of accuracy or something? I don't get it.
Typically most Olympic Style recurve shooters have what is called a clicker on their bow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bow_shape under other equipment) which will sit against the arrow on the opposite side of the bow from the riser and fall off the end of the arrow and make a clicking sound when the archer reaches full draw and tells them to release the arrow immediatly. This results in the bow producing the same force against the arrow each time and thus a better and more accurate shot. On a compound as the cams turn over you will reach a wall that you cannot pull past any more and that is full draw.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talgoran View Post
4) Breathing. I've heard different things from different people, and I'm not sure what the 'best' way is. Should I just breathe evenly as I draw and shoot, and pretty much ignore the issue? Should I inhale as I draw, then exhale while releasing tension in my string fingers? Or another method? What do you guys suggest?
I shoot my bow the same way I shoot my rifle. Breath slowly and relaxed as I approach the shot. When I am at full draw deep breath in through nose and let half out through nose, hold breath, complete shot. If I end up feeling like i need to breath then I have held to long and it is time to let down. How you breath is entirely up to you, but remember that archery is about repeating the same actions over and over again, so whatever breathing method you decide on using practice it every time so that you can repeat it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talgoran View Post
Sorry if any of these questions are amazingly naive haha. Any responses would be great!
The only stupid question is one not asked. We all started out not knowing anything and the quickest way to learn is to ask questions.
__________________
CSAA Member


"One of the serious problems in planning against American doctrine is that the Americians do not read their manuals nor do they feel any obligations to follow their doctrine." - From a Russian Document
Too Many Hobbies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 12:15 AM   #3
Talgoran
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2
Talgoran is on a distinguished road
Default Ahh

Okay, thanks for the response! Especially that bit about the clicker...that sounds useful. Thanks again!
Talgoran is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2004 3DShoots.com