Front of center?

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by Big LB, Dec 7, 2007.

  1. Big LB

    Big LB Junior Member

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    At leagues on Tuesday night I noticed a couple of guys shooting that had their arrows cut really long for their draw length. When I asked one of them about it he said.......Is is because of "front of center" :noidea:
    Can someone explain to me what this means and what is the theory behind it?
    Larry

    Read some about this in a old thread after using the search tool.....but is this the way people are doin' it now-a-days?
    Some said they thought it was silly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2007
  2. BUNNYMAN

    BUNNYMAN I pray for you!

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    can you explain to me where in all the archery books, it says that your arrows, have to be cut to 1 inch past the rest???

    Indoors, speed means NOTHING, so guys shoot the longest arrow possible for forgivness.......

    the more FOC your arrow has, the better your flight should be......

    I personally like my arrows full length for indoor, gets them closer to the target before they leave the bow......:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     

  3. bullfiddle

    bullfiddle Movin on up!!!

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    your silly....:laugh: :laugh:
     
  4. SinGin

    SinGin Banned

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    If I remember correctly, you want the front half of your arrow heavier than the back. So this way the arrow is being pulled to the target with the point instead of pushed.
     
  5. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    I believe (may be wrong on this) but the FOC determines where the arrow will "balance" if placed on an edge.

    The FOC isn't important at all in 20 yard spots... who gives a crap, the arrow goes 20 yards and sticks. almost always its indoor, no wind, no outside pressures... etc.

    (time to steal it from the web: http://www.socalarchery.com/Information/front of center.htm )

    order for an arrow to fly correctly, with the point in the lead and the fletching following, the center of mass must be located somewhere between the tip and the middle of the arrow shaft. If the center of mass is located close to the tip, the arrow will have good stability but will drop quicker because of the heavy nose. However, if the center of mass is located close to the center of the shaft, the arrow will have good range, but arrow flight may be unstable. As you can see the trade offs here are stable arrow flight vs. arrow range. The object is to find a happy medium that will allow you to have the best of both worlds.

    The balance of an arrow can be modified by adding weight to either the front or the rear of the shaft as needed. Heaver vanes, for example, increase the weight of the rear portion of the arrow. Changing points can add weight to the front of the arrow.
     
  6. UltraElite 06

    UltraElite 06 Vote for Pedro

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    Alot of indoor shooters set up arrows longer than needed with a lot of tip weight to help weaken the arrows spine cause if your shooting 2613 eastons out of an 50lb or 60lb. bow they are way overspined so the theory is to leave them long and add a lot of tip weight.
     
  7. bullfiddle

    bullfiddle Movin on up!!!

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    I am kinda old school but I was always tought that your front of center should be about a third of the total arrow shaft length. What this means is that if you balanced your arrow on your finger the length on the point end would hang over your finger about 1/3rd of the arrow the fletch end would be twice that lenght.
     
  8. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    Very good answer.:cool:
     
  9. Pinwheel1969

    Pinwheel1969 #1 THREAD KILLER

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    its just another fad thats been around for ever and making a come back like paper tuning. I dont concern myself with it.
     
  10. HYTMANN

    HYTMANN Senior Member

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    All components being the same weight, a longer shaft will have less FOC than a shorter shaft. Correct FOC is between 7 and 12 percent, more than that is superfluous, less than that could be unstable outdoors or with broadheads. UltraElite06 is correct about spot shooters wanting the biggest diameter shaft possible to grab lines on the spot, which neccessitates the use of a longer than normal shaft and heavier than normal tip weights, as high as 345 grains, to weaken the spine for the lower poundages most spot shooters use. To determine your FOC, measure your arrow length from the throat of the nock to the tip of the point, divide that in half and mark the shaft at that point. Then balance the arrow (a pencil with a perpendicular groove works well for a fulcrum) and mark that point, then measure the distance between the two points and divide that by the total length. Ex, a 28 inch arrow with a balance point 2 inches in front of center has a balance point of 7.14%. I personally like balance points between 7 and 8 percent for most situations, but experiment and see what works best for you.:rockon:
     
  11. Rgrsldg1

    Rgrsldg1 Junior Member

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    I've found the easy way is to go to Gold Tip's web sight, hold the cursor on products and the go down and click on front of center calulator. You'll have to know the weights of everything you put on your arrow and you can also figure out how to balance an arrow for speed or hunting.
     
  12. QSA

    QSA One eyed/Gutless wonder

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    Very wrong, indoor 20 yard it helps the arrow to stabilize faster to have a heavier FOC. That is one reason most shoot a very heaver large arrow indoor spots. I shoot some where around 7% FOC
     
  13. Long Draw

    Long Draw Banned

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    the most mass must be in front of the arrow. If you had a perfectly balanced arrow it would have no stability. If your arrow had rear of center it would flip around back asswards in flight. 3Ders often make the mistake of using too light of points for increased velocity and get a partially unstable arrow, particularly with the large dia. 1 overspined shaft fits all brands. Try to get up to 8-9% with target....and over 10% for hunting. Serious Indoor spots, pros go to very heavy points and FOC approaching 20%. A lil more FOC is a good thing.
     
  14. jcmorgan31

    jcmorgan31 Prodigal Son

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    Here is something else to chew on.

    The point where the arrow contacts the rest is a pivot point. Any shooter induced torque to the riser shows at this point. The further out in front of the rest the tip of your arrow is, the more pronounced this will be. I keep my arrows 1/2" in front of the rest.....:peace:
     
  15. Jay Are

    Jay Are Junior Member

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    Another reason to have good form! :doh: :doh: :biggrin1:

    I never heard that before, but it does make sense... I think. :noidea:
     
  16. jcmorgan31

    jcmorgan31 Prodigal Son

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    Let me clarify also.... this is a theory that I have heard from several people. It makes sense to me and therefore I use it. I have not seen NASA's testing results on paper myself.....:biggrin1:
     
  17. QSA

    QSA One eyed/Gutless wonder

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    Not sure on that one. If your rest was solid I would say yes. But drop rest and most prong rest are spring loaded. A pivot point can not be spring loaded.
     
  18. Werd

    Werd Senior Member

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    Let me fix this for ya dan...dont you mean shot instead of shoot???:doh: :laugh: J.k Wow i really hope u recover from this
     
  19. jcmorgan31

    jcmorgan31 Prodigal Son

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    I'm talking about a left and right pivot, not an up and down pivot.
     
  20. HYTMANN

    HYTMANN Senior Member

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    Left and right pivot would not be affected by arrow length, but it would be determined by rest placement instead. The farther away from the pivot point of the grip, the more movement is exagerated. The point of the arrow should be around 1 inch from the front of the rest for proper alignment of the nodes as the arrow flexes, but a bit more or less is OK too.:rockon: