Info request on Browning compound

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by toxophilus, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. toxophilus

    toxophilus Junior Member

    4
    0
    0
    Hello friends,

    I am an Italian archer, until now have been shooting the traditional way, wooden riser t/d recurve and longbow. I'm not a hunter (until now), usually go for 3d shots in the woods. My archery club admits both traditional and compounds, so I once would like to give the compound style a try.

    I saw yesterday in my town's archery shop a nice compound bow. It's a Browning competition pro, dark red magnesium riser and wooden limbs laminated with white fiberglass. 45# - 60# weight, draw lenght from 27" to 31" (mine is 27,5").

    I have browsed Internet for such bow but didn't find anything. That bow should have been produced around 1988-90 I think, because the guy who sold it to the shop said he was not shooting for about 15 years. It has a nice vintage look and is in perfect, really neat conditions, should have been used only seldom and carefully.

    The price is 150 € which is about 180 $.
    Do you think it would be a good purchase for entering the compound world?
     
  2. CA Rcher12

    CA Rcher12 Member

    51
    0
    0
    An Italian archer,huh? Anyway, I would say the Browning looks like a nice bow.As for the pricing, $180 is a dirt cheap price for a bow, even if it were from the early 90's. Just buy the bow that looks and feels good to you, and if you're proud shooting it, chances are that the bow's great for you. Say, can you get the bow's name and specs to us?
     

  3. toxophilus

    toxophilus Junior Member

    4
    0
    0
    On the lower limb is the name:

    Browning
    PRO COMPETITION
    TARGET
    .... a series of numbers and letters

    the dealer told me it is a "competition pro" model
     
  4. 3D-Dummy

    3D-Dummy Junior Member

    12
    0
    0
    Maybe it's just me, but I think the price for that bow is extremely high. There have been many many advancements in archery over the past 15 years. Unless that bow has some collector value I'd stay clear of it.

    To me the key to being a good archer is being consistent. Even if your for isn't perfect as long as you're exact shot after shot you'll score high. That being said this is where improvements have been made to modern bows. They're designed to improve consistency.

    Becareful of the guy who says he shoots his "old faithful" as good as any new bow out there. He may be telling an untruth or maybe he's just good at being as consistent as possible.

    IMO any (and I mean any) new bow today is ten times the bow of the best 15 years ago.

    good luck....
     
  5. toxophilus

    toxophilus Junior Member

    4
    0
    0
  6. CA Rcher12

    CA Rcher12 Member

    51
    0
    0
    I'm starting to think you can get a better bow than that one. Try to get a bow that is accurate, not fast (+300fps I.B.O.) or one with hatchet cams. This is target archery: you want accuraccy and forgiveness, not a fast bow. Fast bows can be a pain to tune. :)
     
  7. bfisher

    bfisher Senior Member

    816
    4
    0
    Also consider that if you should break a limb you won't be able to find replacements. Wood/glass laminated limbs were all the rage back in the 70's and early 80's. They did have a tendency to weaken over time often showing stress cracks in the glass. Again, parts will be almost non-existant for this bow. It's probably worth more as a collector item than a shooter.

    Browning never impressed me anyway.