maxed out bows and accuracy

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by 62flint, Jul 14, 2007.

  1. 62flint

    62flint Member

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    I was listening the other day. This guy that knows a lot about archery{lest he thought so} was talking to this other feller. I heard him say that he always buys a 60# bow and maxs it out. Cause a bow maxed out is more accurate than say a 60-70 pond bow set on the low end.
    I got to thinking. Can't decide,:noidea: this guy know what he is saying and if so why is it that way?
     
  2. BUNNYMAN

    BUNNYMAN I pray for you!

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    I buy 60lbs bows because there is nothing I cant kill w/60-63lbs....

    A maxed out bowis a more solid bow if that makes sense and in turn will have less vibration and in turn make less noise......:rockon:
     

  3. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    The age old question that everyone asks at one point in their archery life... truth be told I have no clue if its true or not. Other then the obvious (ie: you can't possibly back it out incorrectly on one side as opposed to the other if its tightened down).
     
  4. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    A maxed out bowtech shoots like crap though. Back it out 2 turns and its a smooth shooting machine. I hate shooting my OG with the limbs bottomed out (like it is now) however at 63 - 64 pounds it is a fricken dream to shoot.
     
  5. mdewitt71

    mdewitt71 Senior Member

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    Cam rotation comes into play when you back a bow out to a lighter poundage as well.

    Most people back out the bow and go from there.
    I have found that if you back the limbs out to a lighter poundage, you must ensure the cam rotation is still at its "optimum" performance position like it was when It was maxed out.
    I can pick up anywhere from 3-9 FPS and better sound and vibe performance by ensuring the cam is timed at the current shooting wieght and not just the maxed wieght.
     
  6. Sniper

    Sniper Senior Member

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    Like he said. Go all the way in, and come out a little, insuring equal release of weight. When you start turning the screws back to lighten things, the limbs don't always have equal tension when you are done. Fixing that is possible, but tough. Getting the limbs to throw forward equally is the problem. The bow is made to shoot, say 70 lbs. Anything else is off kilter for it.
     
  7. bullspotter

    bullspotter Senior Member

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    humm ive heard this too. and did some messing around with it, and found it to be false info in my case, not saying its not true for someone else, I was using my trykon for hunting and for indoor, so after hunting season i would switch arrows and crank it down. when adjusting the DW, it will change the tiller, and cam rotation a bit, so i would always even the tiller, and twist strings to get the timing i desire. Still achived a great shooting bow, and didnt really hear a differance as far as noise. I have also seen some bows that when you crank the limb bolts all the way in, the tiller is not even. As a rule of thumb, ive always heard to max out the bolts then take 1 full turn off them. I dont look at how far the bolts are in or out on my bows, ill adjust them to the #s i want, then even the tiller, and fine tune each till the tiller is exact where i want it, at the DW i want. also twisting the string and cables to adjust cam timing, will change the DW a bit.
     
  8. Sniper

    Sniper Senior Member

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    That's a lot of work bullspotter. I know a guy who helped a guys problem by making adjustments to each limb, so that the cranks were actually different. The bow was quieter and much more accurate. course he's been doing archery for about 50 years. Guess he picked it up somewhere. Things can be so complicated.
     
  9. bullspotter

    bullspotter Senior Member

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    Yeah its some work, but all those things are important to have the bow perform at its best, I got bashed at the bowshop when i parked my new vectrix xl and broke out the trykon for hunting, everyone was like why would yo do that? the vectrix is so mouch better..... so after some explaining and showing how quiet and what a good shooter my trykon was, they understood, my trykon mirrors my vectrix xl , for speed, noise and accuracy, both seem to be = as far as forgiveness, only real differance is the draw cycle on the vectrix is much nicer. but with only shooting 68 lbs with the trykon its not a issue for hunting.
     
  10. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    I have an '06 Allegiance and I'm about to swap out the string and cables.
    Does anyone have information on cam timing and tiller for Bowtech's ?
    Mathews has a ton of good info in their forum's 'sticky' posts on that kind of stuff. The last time I looked, yesterday, Bowtech didn't ahev anything.

    Thanks,
    Ron
     
  11. bowman76

    bowman76 Junior Member

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    I've always heard that a bow maxed out at 60lbs. is a more efficient bow than a 70lbs. bow turned down to 60lbs.
     
  12. mdewitt71

    mdewitt71 Senior Member

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    Again, cam rotation/ timing plays into it.

    I can tell you I have shot my 05 Allegiance, 06 Tribute, 06 Newberry Sabre, and all my Ross bows at Max and Min poundage and IF the cams are rotated and timed correctly at min poundage they are just as efficient thru the chrony keeping with the same ratio arrow wieght (maybe a 1-2 fps off on some models, but dead on on others).