new bow...draw weight, and trigger release

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by supermarvin76, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. supermarvin76

    supermarvin76 Junior Member

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    I am an extreme novice to archery and bow hunting. Ok, I have never actually been bow hunting but I am in the learning stage and plan to make trips when I am ready.

    I have owned a bow about 10 years ago but it was not set up for me and I barley shot that one.

    I have done a bit of research and went out to Gander Mountain this morning and bought a Fred Bear Instinct. $292 total out the door. I did not purchase any other accessories with it.

    ANYWAY....on with my questions:

    1. I was thinking that I would like a trigger release (if that’s what they’re called) but when I attempted to shoot with one today at Gander Mountain, I was not able to draw. I find this crazy that it makes that much of a difference. Any advice with that?

    2. The draw weight is set at 50lbs right now. It is not difficult for me, nor is it easy for me. What muscles are used to draw? And, what is the best way to make it easier to draw?

    Any other general info, tips or advice would be greatly appreciated!!!

    Thanks
     
  2. bullfiddle

    bullfiddle Movin on up!!!

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    I am not sure what type of release you were trying to shoot with but I have found that a release with a wrist strap is a little easier to draw with than a hand held.

    You need to learn to use the muscles in your back and shoulders to draw your bow. You will learn this with practice.

    I am not sure what the draw weight range is on your bow but have the bow set so you can easily draw your bow and practice an hour a day until you feel comfortable with the draw and shooting your new bow. Gradually build up the muscles in your back and shoulders by increasing the draw weight a few pounds at a time. But don't over do the weight settings and the length of time you are practicing. If your bow is set to high or you continue to practice after you start to feel fatigued you will start to develop bad habits.

    My best advice to you would be to find a competent pro shop and see if they have an instructor who can teach you about form and proper bow shooting techniques. Welcome to the forum:peace:
     

  3. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    That is very good advice and I would stick to that.

    As far as releases you need to try as many as you can. Strap releases for hunting are almost the norm, but people vary in their selection. Get your draw weight and length right and have a peep sight served into the string at the proper spot (where you're comfortable at an anchor point) and then get your sight and rest set up. I good shop will help you with that. You may pay a bit more at a good pro shop but you will likely not walk out dissatisfied. Take your time, practice a lot... Shooting a bow is a lot like lifting weights. You have to start slow and work yourself up to where you can shoot 100 arrows or more in a session. Don't try and do a lot at first. A calm and collected approach with some coaching from your shop will get you in the direction you should be in.

    Welcome to the forum and please ask questions or provide information. This is a good site.

    Ron