Traditional Longbows for hobby

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by PaulPool, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. PaulPool

    PaulPool Junior Member

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    Oops, meant to say just bows, not longbows.

    Yes, this is a "what bow is good for me" topic. I have been doing research on the internet, and I am not much better off in making a decision.

    First off, I have always been interested in archery. My parents got me a cheap dollar-store slingshot when I was a kid, and boy did I love it. I got good enough to hit trees with it... say close to 50 feet away, no matter how much the pebble's flight path curved. I did get it from the dollar store after all. Hence, it soon broke from me shooting at such distances.

    My friend and his father are very much into hunting. They have an extensive gun collection, and his father also enjoys using traditional bows.

    That is what I am looking for. I have been to Dick's sporting good and tried out them new-fangled compound bows, which ease up when you pull them all the way back. I don't like them. It seems to take away half the fun. Plus, Traditional bows look so much cooler. :cool:

    I have not had my official draw length measured, but it seems to be 30".
    I am 18 years old, 6"3, 225 lbs, with a strong upper body. I enjoy chopping wood for our fireplace, and other such activities, as they come easy to me.

    Getting back to bows, from what I read, a Composite bow would probably be what I am looking for. I have heard that Mongolian bows actually have longer distance than English longbows.
    I might get into hunting eventually, but for the moment it would only be a hobby, I'd practice my archery in my backyard. Hence, I'm not all into speed. What I am interested in is distance, the longer I can shoot accurately the better.

    Now I expect that using a good traditional bow that's designed for long distance would take months, years of practice. Bring it on, I sez. That's partly the reason, the challenge of perfecting my skill!

    I'm sure there are some really great bows for what I am looking for, but also require a large wallet, heh. I don't have much money to spend. I've read that stores sometimes carry used bows. That's probably right up my alley.
    My friend and his dad probably would know where I could get a bow, where stores are and such. My friend used to be a Civil war re-enactor with his father, his dad still is. But I'd still like to get some opinions as to what bows you could suggest for me.

    A quick re-cap for those who don't have the time to read my ramblings above:

    I'm looking for a traditional-bow, emphasis on distance and accuracy, that looks just as great hanging on display over my fireplace as it does when I'm using it. I don't mind a long 'learning curve', and I am looking forward to a challenge.
    I will be using it for hobby, practicing in my backyard. I don't plan on using it for hunting any time soon. However, I am looking for a serious bow, I think I'm just about out of the "youth" category.
    I am on a tight budget, so a used bow is probably what I'd get. But what kind of bow is the purpose of this topic.

    Traditional Bows would also need more taking care of, so if you have any useful websites that talk about what accessories I would need, and so on, please list them. I enjoy reading.

    If you have any questions, need more information, etc, please reply to this thread. I also have put my AIM screenname in my profile.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  2. brokenarrow

    brokenarrow Evil Genius

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    Welcome...
    Traditional bows don't need any extra taking care of...they are real basic and easy to tune.

    As for what bow to buy...???
    What's your budget...$300, $500, $700

    Look at PSE they make some good recurves...I personally like the Coyote...
    I own several Bear recurves and some Brownings...They are all good bows

    As for speed that will be dictated by DW and DL
    Most traditional bows are built using a 28" DL as a basis and then increase or decrease poundage roughly 3# for every inch above or below 28"
    Here's a couple links...
    http://www.fsdiscountarchery.com/
    http://www.traditional-archery-supply.com/index.html
     

  3. PaulPool

    PaulPool Junior Member

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    hmm... $300 is the lowest price range? It seems I have lots of time to browser then! *knee-slap*

    I'd like to keep the price for the bow itself under under $200, at the most. Maybe later down the road when I have more money and I know more what I'm doing I can invest in a better bow. I'm leaning more torwards low-cost practice bow at this moment. And the ones that look nice over a over-place are too expensive for me. :doh:

    I noticed some nice wooden longbows for under $100 in the Wood Bow section down the fsdiscountarchery page that seems easy to take care of.

    PSE does have nice bows, the Legacy long bow and Sequoia caught my eye.

    As did this: http://www.fsdiscountarchery.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=2408
    Bearpaw has some nice english wooden bows too.

    What about Recurved or Longbow? I won't really be running around the woods, so a longbow doesn't seem to be a problem. Someone said that with a long draw like 30", a bow under 60" is not reccomended.

    Yeah, DW and DL... yea. :noidea: Neither do I have any idea about what size and weight bow I should get. Maybe you could give me some reccomended #'s that I could try at a store?

    Also, I forgot to ask about Arrows. Does it matter what type of arrows I get for my bow? Do you think someone at a hunting store would be able to advise me on the right type of arrows?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  4. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    A couple more places to look up.
    http://www.tradtalk.com/forums/index.php
    http://www.martinarchery.com/
    http://www.tradgang.com/
    http://www.3riversarchery.com/
    http://www.kustomkingarchery.com/
    Tradtalk and tradgang are forums sites with classifeds.
    The others, stores or manufacturers.
    With your height and draw lenth you don't want a short bow unless it's been made with your draw lenth in mind. In a recurve I would think you'd want at least a 62-64" bow. A Longbow even longer. If you've never owned one, I would suggest starting out with no more than 40lbs. I understand you may be strong enough for much more, but better to get good form sorted out. I would also start with a resonably priced one for your first until you have a true idea of what your doing. There is a bunch of custom bow makers out there, I had no idea. Do a little reading in those 2 trad sites, you should get a better understanding of whats out there. Martin, PSE, Bear have been around a long time and still make good bows for a fair price Checkmates have gained a good reputation for bang-for-buck on a semi-custom, but you would order that and wait. Most anything else will go up in price from what I've seen.
     
  5. brokenarrow

    brokenarrow Evil Genius

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    That's a nice looking bow, I don't know anything about Internature though.
    Look at the PSE Impala also...
    At 6'3" I would stay above 60"...Bear also makes a nice Kodiak Hunter...
    As Far as Draw weight...I like them around 50#...So at 30" you would be shooting 56# that's no bad...but that's up to your judgement...I know guy's that shoot 80#... Just not for me

    Recurves generally are a little faster than longbows...They also have longer brace heights...again shoot a couple if you can and see what you like...
    Now Arrows...You can shoot pretty much whatever you want...just make sure the spine is good for the bow...I would suggest Cabons w/ Feathers to start and when you get proficient you can buy some Cedar shafts...I only suggest to start w/ carbon because they are a little more durable...
     
  6. kbohunt

    kbohunt are u a fat boy?

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    Yep!

    Well you came to the right place.
    By your size and all i would get a 60lb recurve or better in the poundage range if ya wont to get distance.
    I shoot a 55lb PSE Talon recurve Takedown.
    The Impalia is simular price not to bad eather.
    I would buy a used bow on e-bay or a simular forum classified to see if your intrest stays there.
    I shoot all bows and desided this year to get back into triditional and purchased a Darton Ranger recurve on E-bay for $60 and shot awile and looked around and found the real 1 i wanted which was a takedown.
    I later sold the darton in augest for $10 more than i payed for it!
    You can get deals just have to look.
    Start small,hope this helps:welcome:
     
  7. PaulPool

    PaulPool Junior Member

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    The longbows at Martin Archery look really sweet, traditional yet modern. There's a store not too far from where I live, I'll try to check it out next time I'm in the area.
    Although from looking at other website, those bows are in the $500-$800 range... But good to know.
    Tomahawk bows seem perfect, but again all above $600

    That Impala seems like a good beginner bow.

    I'm sure somewhere there are longbows for under $200.

    What's wrong with Internature? I really like how that bow looks. Nice and natural. More serious-looking than some of the thinner longbows.

    Why do you reccommend recurved, kbohunt? I thought Longbows shoot longer... Thanks for the welcome!
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  8. brokenarrow

    brokenarrow Evil Genius

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    Oh I never said there was anything wrong with them...I said I don't know anything about them
    I liked the looks of it also...
     
  9. kbohunt

    kbohunt are u a fat boy?

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    O.k.

    Long bows are longer and stright limb bows,they dont shoot any farther.
    Its all in what you feel is the best.
    The recurve is smooth and dosnt have a kick where longbows have a kick in your hand at the shot.
    I like Take-down Recurves so you can take the limbs off and its compact.
    Like i said its all in what feels good in your hands and while shooting.
    If ya shot mine though you would fall in love with it.
    Its almost the same as the PSE-Impala its the Talon!
    Heres a pic.:biggrin1:
     
  10. PaulPool

    PaulPool Junior Member

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    That looks like a reliable bow you got there. But then again, I haven't shot any bow, so I can't relate.

    So you're saying it really doesn't make a different in distance, be it Recurved or Longbow?

    What about hybrids?

    I am moving this week to a new house with a small woods in the backyard, if I can get a bow by next month I would be out there every week practicing. I read about some Longbows that are thicker wood, or without R/D can give you some handshock if you don't hold it tight, but why would anyone want that if recurves shoot just as fast/far/accurately as them?

    I guess I'm asking for a layout of pros/cons/features of Longbow VS Recurved and hybrid. But I do agree that I would still have to try it out myself to see what I am comfortable with. I am most interested in distance, accuracy, and fatigue.
     
  11. chelleo

    chelleo Senior Member

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    :welcome: as well and welcome to the varied and fun sport of Archery. I have one word of advise and that's NOT to get too heavy poundage right away. I believe someone mentioned that early on but it's a very important point. Also don't get too short a bow either because you don't want to have the limbs bending too much and that could give you some issues which I won't go into here now. If your Draw Length is around 30" you probably want the longer limbs...possibly medium length which is around 68" but I for example when I started using a recurve I was kinda inbetween short and medium limbs. I used short limbs until my form got better and now just got some medium limbs which are working much better for me. I have a 25" draw length using my compound but I think I've stretched to almost 26" with my recurve. So you can see lots can change...but always keep in mind HAVE FUN no matter what you do!
     
  12. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    Paul your best bet is to try and find a shop, really. Try a couple longbows and recurves. The grips can be quite different for one thing. Some recurves have mount holes for sights and rests if thats a possibility. Accuracy distance and fatigue point me towards a recurve of 30-40 lbs, with such fittings for sights and a rest. You don't have to use them, you can shoot off the shelf and use no sights at all but aim instinctively, which does take time and practice. The hand shock thing I would'nt worry about too much. They all have some, just longbows may have a little more thump in the hand. Also, take a brouse through Lancaster Archery's recurve selection. An olympic style recurve can be put together for a fairly resonable amount. You'd be looking at a riser, limbs, string. Most of these risers come in 23 or 25" lenths, the limbs, short, medium and longs. The limb weights (strenth) is usually listed for a given riser. These ILF style limbs also do not stack, but draw out smoothly. A big dude like you I'd try you on long limbs first. So many options here, and everyone has their own opinion. No right or wrong. But the best way is to try to get a few in your hands even for a couple shots which means a shop or club or something along those lines. And don't hold it against me but I lived in NJ at one time. It's been a long time since but I'm sure you could find a shop or club, there are no boonies left there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2007
  13. PaulPool

    PaulPool Junior Member

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    I have found a New Jersey TradArchery-specific website, and I've been finding some store locations from there.

    Hopefully not too long after we move I can visit one. Right now it's monday night, we have to be gone by the 31st. We haven't even started packing...

    :faint2:
     
  14. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    You'd better get busy.