Bareshaft tuning...

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by Jay Are, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. Jay Are

    Jay Are Junior Member

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    Didn't want to Hijack Wheels3's thread, but after reading her thread here is a question I want to pose to everyone:

    Does anyone bare shaft tune your bow? I had an experienced shooter tell me that if you shoot a bare shaft arrow (no vanes) out of your bow at 20 yards, that it should hit slightly higher than your vaned arrows. If it doesn't --- than you have a tuning problem. Based on where the arrow hits, you should move your rest.

    What's everyone's thoughts?
     
  2. Allen

    Allen Senior Member

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    This subject ends up in a lot of disagreement because there are two general types of bare shaft tuning.

    The first is the "Bare Shaft Planing Test". This is valid only for finger shooters, not release shooters. It is done by comparing point of impact of arrows with and without fletching. The only information that it gives you is if your arrows have the correct spine for your bow's draw weight and, again, it only works for finger shooters.

    The second type of bare shaft tuning is to simply remove the fletching and tune your bow with paper, walkback and group tuning. This has to be done with an understanding of how weight on the nock end of your arrow effects dynsuch as Quickspins will give you less than acceptable results because they cause amic arrow spine. However, it can give quite good results. Very heavy vanes the dynamic spine to stiffen significantly.

    I'm a release shooter & I've tried the Bare Shaft Planing test with several different bows and arrows with the spine way out of optimal. If my bow is reasonably in tune, I get no difference in point of impact between fletched & unfletched arrows, even back to 50 yards.

    For most of us, myself included, we will get much more results from practicing our form rather than worrying about tuning out bows to absolute perfection. Tinkering and tuning are fun and one of the parts of archery that I enjoy, but it won't make you more accurate, only good form will do that.

    Good luck,
    Allen
     

  3. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    I only shoot the bare shafts if I've changed something, and then I'm comparing them to where fletched hit as well as how the bare shaft itself is flying. I try to get the bareshafted arrow to hit nice and straight, not nock high or low, nor left or right. Then shoot some fletched and see where your at. Move the fletched to the bare shafts. It should'nt have to move much. Getting bare shafts to hit good is similar to paper tuning in that it's very sensitive to bow hand pressure and a clean release. Be as consistant shot to shot as you can.
     
  4. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    I don't dispute what Allen is saying at all. In my case I'm using it as a means to see if my rest is in the correct height and distance from the riser. It will also tell me if my cam(s) orientation or timing is off. It can also be usful in tuning the cable yokes.
     
  5. whitetail99

    whitetail99 Senior Member

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    A little help for bare shaft tuning is weight down the nock end with the same amount of grains to keep the F.O.C the same.
     
  6. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    I think I agree with Allen on this one. Its not like I'm gonna be shootin bareshafts at targets or game so why worry about how they fly if my fletched arrows fly true.:noidea:
     
  7. red44

    red44 Senior Member

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    I obviously don't shoot anything but paper with bare shafts either. The point is to get the bare shaft going as good as possible without any fletching to aid in correcting flight, that means your fletching has less work to do and your set-up is a little more forgiving of less than perfect actions by the indian. Paper punching or fieldpoint use it won't matter much. But it does help when you put a fixed blade broadhead on. If for example, your bareshafts hit to the right of fletched, I bet your broadheads will too.
     
  8. Allen

    Allen Senior Member

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    I should proof read my posts a little better. :doh:

    This sentence should be:
    This has to be done with an understanding of how weight on the nock end of your arrow effects dynamic spine. If you add heavy vanes such as Quickspins, the bare shaft tuning may give less than acceptable results because of the large weight difference.

    Sorry about that guys.

    Allen