brace height quiestion & axle to axle?

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by yotie, May 8, 2008.

  1. yotie

    yotie New Member

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    i know that the longer brace height & longer axle to axle make for a more forgiving bow! but the question is, whats the so called happy medium for target/ 3-d bows. i have a hunting bow that i will be using in the 3-d, and am very comfortable with it in the field. found a five spot tournament in morristown, tn. 30min away from me. now i'm hooked and need more input on the finelines i will need to follow for the acuracy i will need to reach! thanks in advance for all your help...
     
  2. J.C.

    J.C. New Member

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    it varies by the shooter's size and personal taste. I'm pretty tall and have a long drawlength at 30.5". I use a 33" bow for hunting and shoot it pretty good, but for target, I prefer a bow 36" and over. I like brace heights 7" and over. a person with a shorter draw length might like something shorter. String angle at full draw is something to take into account. the shorter the bow the farther the peep is from the shooters eye.
     

  3. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    Serious tournament shooters that also bowhunt tend to use a different bow for each for reasons you seem to be aware of. Budget minded bowhunters like me that also target and 3D shoot tend to use only one bow. The most important things I'm learning about acccuracy is consistant form and anchor point, slow release instead of punching the trigger and practice, practice, practice to make all this automatic. Any quality bow that fits me is far more accurate than I am. Have fun, I do.
     
  4. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    Most people I know and shoot with use their hunting setup for 3D. 3D is a lot of fun and is really very good practice for hunting. The bigger difference you'll see in bow geometry is indoor vs. 3D/hunting. Most people I know that use their hunting bows for 3D have a different bow for indoor target. Most of those bows have a longer ata (~40") and a larger brace height (~7-1/2"). They are slower in general but forgiving. With indoor fixed distance (20 yards) you don't necessarily benefit from the speed but you do benefit from the forgiveness.

    Hope that helps.

    Ron
     
  5. brokenarrow

    brokenarrow Evil Genius

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  6. yotie

    yotie New Member

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    hows about a drop away rest???

    thanks guys, for all your help. looking at an older bow- the hoyt deviater, set with 46# pull carbonite limbs d-cam at 29 in draw, same as mine. i know the brace height is 8.0 or better 40" axle to axle. i have a toxonixs sights with .019 pin with 6x ziess scope. i need to find the right target rest for this bow. i see how important this is as the indoor targets are only 20 yards..
    and yes i will be shooting fat boys easton x7's with nib points. i have seen the rest at a distance that looks like someone glued a sparkplug gap gauge on and cut a v in it.. what ever that is do need the same???
     
  7. J.C.

    J.C. New Member

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    that rest is called a lizard tongue or a spring steel and they are very good rests but you should do fine with a prong or any kind of rest that is properly set up. a lot of high end prong rests like the GKF premier include the lizard tongue with the standard prongs. Trophy taker makes a good one too.
     
  8. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    Yeah, exactly, another rest to check out is the NAP QuickTune 3000. It has a double prong setup but also includes a 'lizard tongue' launcher as well.
    You might find it easier to draw without the arrow falling of the rest with a double prong rest as opposed to the lizard tongue. It's good for target, 3D and indoor. I use a NAP 3000 on my hunting/3D bow and I love it. Very easy to adjust and tune and very forgiving if you have the 'jitters' during the draw.

    Ron