Deep woods food plots

Discussion in 'Bowhunting forum' started by scottg, Jun 5, 2007.

  1. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    This is kinda of an off question, but. Has anyone had any luck using an ATV disc for food plots? In our hunting club, we have many stands on gas lines, power lines and hunt over clear cuts. That all works well with a rifle. I am looking at planting some food plots in the woods where a tractor can't get. Just some little hot spots for bow hunting.

    Thanks
     
  2. kbohunt

    kbohunt are u a fat boy?

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    Ha, there scott!

    I have taken nothing more than a rake, a hoe & 10 lbs of bio-logic green patch, way down in a swamp and planted a small patch about 30yds By 15yds
    And put a miniral block in the middle of it.
    If your gonna do it, do it now, its a little late but if you put it near water on a creek bank & make sure it can get a little sun, not to much it will burn it like your lawn in the heat of the summer.
    I look near a creek bank where i can set-up where a deer trail crosses the creek plant it there where the folige looks good,shade with a little sun.
    Hope this helps!:biggrin1:
     

  3. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    I planted some Bio Logic Hot Spot last year and it did well. We have a lot of piney woods and clear cuts in our hunting club. I have 2 stands in a patch of 7 year old pines. In the low spots, the pines are real thin and that is where we have cut shooting lanes, some out to 100 yds long and 10 - 15 yds wide. The pines are planted far enough apart that an ATV can slip right trough them. I just can't get a tractor down the trails. But I do use the no plow seed in places that I can't get my ATV into.

    Thanks
     
  4. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    Yes, they work well. We rent one every year to add/replace food plots.

    Kbohunt is right, you need some sun but not full sun. General location is a key ingredient to have a food plot that actually works. Do some scouting and weigh your choices.

    Also, if you have a heavey population of evergreen type trees you might want to bring a soil sample in to your local nursery, have them test it (they ususally do it for free), and get some of the appropriate fertilizer. Pine trees make the ground acidic, which oftentimes make it difficult to grow grasses and such. When I tore out a couple of huge evergreens and dug out the stumps I think I used a 14-14-14 mixture of fertilizer before I raked in the grass seed. It's growing like crazy.

    Hope that helps and good luck with your project.

    Ron
     
  5. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    We have been planting food plots all over the place, but none in romote areas. Some of our back woods spots you can get to with a tractor, but most are just an ATV trail. I was wanting to make a few little honey holes. We have many club food plots, but they are hard to bow hunt on with the stands a good ways from the grass. Thanks for the information.
     
  6. BUNNYMAN

    BUNNYMAN I pray for you!

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    use a climber in a closer tree, if that is an option......:noidea:
     
  7. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    A climber is an option and I have used that. Where I live, the only time that you see the big boys in the open is during the rutt. Our rutt starts in December. All of our bow hunters, hunt back woods. We do have one guy that hunts on the gas / power line with a bow. There is one bottom that is a highway for hogs and he always gets one or two a year there. This gas / power line that runs through our lease is 80 yds wide.