How much $ does it take

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by moonlite, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. moonlite

    moonlite Junior Member

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    I have become very interested in bowhunting and have no experience. I feel it is an important skill to have. That being said... how much money will it take to get a good setup, I mean the whole enchilada? All I have is the camo clothes and a strong desire to learn. I'll be looking to hunt pig and deer.

    There is a local shop near me that I'm going to visit, but I wanted to get some unbiased advice first. Thanks in advance and I look forward in becoming part of this group.
     
  2. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    First off :welcome: to the forum. Make sure you are measured for Draw Length and Draw Weight. These two items are the most important when starting off. If you are just wanting something entry level then $400 could get you everything. If you but a kit then you could probably do it cheaper. Now for a top of the line setup your talking $1000-$1500. You can also check out the classifieds here or on Archerytalk. Sometimes guys sell completely setup bows with all the trimmings at some very nice prices. Good luck and have fun.:peace:
     

  3. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    Both of my sons got into bowhunting this year, they went with the Bowtech Tomkat which is a complete ready to shoot package. Add arrows and and a release and your ready. Some packages are less than others, but most all are good bows. Just find a bow that fits you and feels good.

    Welcome :welcome: :welcome:
     
  4. moonlite

    moonlite Junior Member

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    Thank you... I hope the bowhunters and archers in my area are as welcoming as this forum.

    I wanted to get something that was a step up from the entry level package. I don't want the bow to limit me as I advance in the sport... so maybe something intermediate will be good. What is the average draw weight used for taking down deer and pig? If it is strength that limits this... I will pump some iron to work up to it :biggrin1:
     
  5. tnts79

    tnts79 Senior Member

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    I would say 60-65 is the norm. you can hunt with less but with 60-65 you will have enough energy to overcome marginal shot placement. It's always best if you can make a perfect shot, but that doesn't always happen:frusty:! I used to shoot 72 lbs. but I backed down my trykon to 65, I shoot much better now. It's all what you are comfortable with. Good luck, check the classifieds, you can generally pick up some good deals!
     
  6. moonlite

    moonlite Junior Member

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    Yes, classifieds are good and that is how I usually shop. But since I'm new to the sport I don't feel comfortable buying some thing like that. Unless I just use to store to fit myself with a Bowtech Tomkat and then find that size. I don't think I can wait that long though. I think its going to be love at first sight with the Tomkat.
     
  7. BUNNYMAN

    BUNNYMAN I pray for you!

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    "pumping iron is not what will make you BOW muscles stronger, only shooting your bow and building those muscle groups will improve you ability to shoot more poundage.....

    take a look at the Mission X4......I think this bow would be more than enough for the beginer and will be a good bow even for the more advanced shooter......

    and at $449 msrp.......you could set the whole thing up for around 6-7 hundred dollars and have one heck of a setup......:rockon:

    now if you looking for a do it all bow, you will find out that if you stay with this sport long enough, there are reasons why 1 bow will not cover all venues....just like one gun will NOT do it all......
     
  8. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    Some manufacturers sell ready to go packages. If you are worried about picking out sights and rest and all the goodies. I would suggest getting a package. If you have never had a bow and don't know much about all the gadgets, it is hard to have a starting point.

    When my sons got their bows this year (Bowtech Tomkat package), they knew nothing. Now that they have some knowledge, they will upgrade their sights, etc. The Tomkat sights are good, but not the best. Budget played a big part in what they bought. I spent almost twice what they did on my Bowtech Tribute, that still has a 29" draw length and 70 lb draw weight. My Tribute will not kill a deer any more dead than their Tomkat's will.
     
  9. scottg

    scottg Huntin Junkie

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    I forgot the investment issue. My boys picked up their Tomkats for about $650 or $700 each with arrows and release and taxes.
     
  10. pilot

    pilot Senior Member

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    The Tomkat is a good one....also check out the Fred Bear bows and the Diamond bows as both make some pretty good bows for the money. I got a Fred Bear Instinct complete setup including arrows, release and carry case for about $650-$700. This was gonna be my entry level setup almost 2 years ago to get back into bow hunting and to be honest, i like the bow so much that i'm still shooting it.
     
  11. jcmorgan31

    jcmorgan31 Prodigal Son

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    Look at the Martin Cheetah, Bengal and MOAB. All are great bows and won't empty your pockets.
     
  12. moonlite

    moonlite Junior Member

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    This is great!! Just what I was looking for... a place to start.

    Thanks again!
     
  13. BillT

    BillT Junior Member

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    Normal freeweight exercises won't help

    "If it is strength that limits this... I will pump some iron to work up to it"

    Welcome to the site, Moonlight. THere's a lot of good people here.

    Anyway, normal freeweight presses, curls and extensions won't do it because they don't isolate the right muscle groups.

    If you message me I will email you some sheets that show how to strengthen the deltoid, trapezius, rhomboids and rotator cuff muscles. These are the ones that put most bow hunters on the side lines. The exercises use low weights and a lot of reps. I got them from a physical therapist so they're legit.

    Something else I learned: if you use a 60-70 # bow, and you're new to the sport, resist the temptation to shoot 60 or 100 shots in a day several times a week. Break yourself in at a moderate pace.

    Good Luck,

    BillT
     
  14. kbohunt

    kbohunt are u a fat boy?

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    Hi,Moonlight!

    Getting into an intermediate package around $500
    Go to a pro-shop get fitted and find a bow your comfortable with.
    I wouldnt buy your first bow in classifieds but you can get deals in the big box stores.
    I just came back from a pro-shop that had a bow i likes a PSE-Mossyoak
    Price $589 But at Bass-pro its $499 now the pro-shop is selling the 08 and bass is selling the 07 so you have to choose is there much of a difference.
    In my case yes they have changed a lot on this bow so ill buy it at the pro-shop.
    Now theres a $200 difference between the same pro-shop and cabelas on the Browning Marage and they havent changed a thing on the bow so i would buy at cabalas.
    Also if you cant work on your own bow i would STRONGLY suggest buying from the Pro-shop.

    Your other ? Weight of a hunting bow!
    50 to 65lbs if its a woman or youngster atleast 45lbs.
    I shoot 64lbs hunting, 55lbs on my recurve and 56lbs on my target bow.

    1 more thing :welcome: to the forum and enjoy!:wave: