long stabilizers

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by protec king, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. protec king

    protec king Junior Member

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    Shooting a long stabilizer is something new for me. I am moving from hunter class to open class and am increasing my stabilizer length. Do I have to have a counter balance offsetting to the rear (v bar style unit) or can I just screw on a 30" stabilizer and forget the rest. Reason is, with the price of doinker stabilizers, I would like to purchase a 30" stabilizer and a quick release only. If I need the counter balance with the longer stabilizer then I will purchase it, but to save a buck, do I really need it?
     
  2. magooo2

    magooo2 Junior Member

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    I had the same problem when moving from a short to a long stabalizer. Try to save money (ie shoot b4 you but ) is always essential. A quick answer to your question is no it is not needed right away. It has alot to do with shooting style. You might find that you might need one left or right depending on hand torque. I wouldnt purchase the rear stabalizer as a weight counterbalance until you have shot a while,tried several,and then determined it would be helpful. Thats my 2 cents
     

  3. glenny

    glenny Senior Member

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    Some do some don't?

    I personally have Doinker,and I have used the v-bar setup on the back.
    I know you can get away with just a sidemount and a small amount of weight on one side but It depends what the bow is doing...
    If you hang the bow on a string from the top cam you can see what that level bubble is doing for usually the fact of the sight's weight on the other side of the bow makes it canter up on the left.
    I also just don't look at getting that level,it's a matter of how well the bow sits in my hand when in full draw.This is why I on three different bows now hve done dfferent things to make that bow in perticular sit in full draw the way that I prefer it to be.When I hold the bow infull draw it sits like a rock on the bullseye and then when the shot goes off the bow then drops forward gradually on the followthrough.
    A proshop or shoot might be the place to go and ask if you can try theirs and see what it does on your bow.
    I do know I change weights occasionally just to give me more or less holding capabilties,If there is wind or I maybe drank too much caffeine,I can add weight.
    You can usually always add weight....if you by one too heavy your stuck with what you got.
    This will also give you some advantages of what work best for what kind of stabilizer,v-bar,sidemount,acc.you might really need.
     
  4. tnarcher

    tnarcher Junior Member

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    I would make one suggestion in chosing a stablizer. Stick with one that is 18 to 26 inches. Hualing around a 30 to 36 inch stablizer can get very tiring on a 3D course.

    I myself only use the front stablizer, as vbars usually throw me off when trying to site in on the target and keeping to bow level. It basically comes down to your shooting style as what works for one doesn't work for the other.
     
  5. R.Sean

    R.Sean Junior Member

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    I also wondered the same so thanks for the answers!!!! :)
     
  6. martinlover

    martinlover Junior Member

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    i shoot without adding any counter balance works great :D
     
  7. heavy dart

    heavy dart Junior Member

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    I agree with tnarcher.Longer stab. are awkward and sometimes frustrating.
    I was shooting with a 30" Cartel and switched to a 24" Super Stix with quick release, much better.I like the sliding weight and torque counter action ability of this stab. :)
    Regards heavy dart
     
  8. glenny

    glenny Senior Member

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    I just outdid the awequardness

    I took my Doinker 10"v-bar on the back and replaced it with a suppression mount,put it out front connected to a 30".
    I measured it,it is 40" on the head right now,might take off some weight in the front,ya really don't know what is gonna happen till ya shoot it about a couple dozen times.
    I Love my stabilizers on my setup,and wouldn't be putting up the numbers like I do(at times,ah,ha)...if I couldn't hold a rock solid bow.
    The whole concept is to add weight and take it off to balance the bow,even according to what kind of conditions I might be in.
    If it is windy,I add some.
    If I have alot of shooting to do,say 2 3d's or a full feild round,I might take some off.
    I noticed that alot of shooting and all this weight on here really can play a toll on the upper shoulder and backtention muscles.When you do end up working them out over a period of time and drop some weight off,or go indoors out of the wind you can dramatically see a huge difference in the way the bow somehow stays directly on the bull without any effort at all.
    To me,I would not say alot of weight is really needed to acheive such a thing,but,the longer the stabilizer the better, for me anyways...Doink.doink.
     
  9. Shel

    Shel Junior Member

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    Stabs

    I don't know anybody who hasn't got a few cast off stabs in the corner. I used to spend before trying them out, but now I mooch from other shooters for a round or two before spending. Archers are a wonderfull group in general - willing to help generally. Just my thoughts - good luck! Shel - ProString ;)
     
  10. glenny

    glenny Senior Member

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    Yes,most of us are willing...

    I wouldn't turn anyone down to try out my stuff.
    I guess I just don't have alot in the corner,I was smart and did exactly this.