Oh jeez. Where to start?

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by NM_Shooter, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. NM_Shooter

    NM_Shooter Junior Member

    5
    0
    0
    As a kid, I spent 100's of hours in my rural backyard with my old recurve bow shooting paper plates on hay bales. An old bow, three fingered glove, bent arrows, and I was good for an afternoon.

    I am gaining access to some excellent elk hunting, and want to try using a bow every other year to change up the hunt a little. I am a competitive gun shooter, and I can see myself getting interested in 3D as well. My wife says that my hobby is "collecting hobbies". She may be right. BTW.. I want to shoot a compound as I have an elbow injury that I need to pamper a bit.

    Anyway, I have been lurking here for awhile, and thought I would work up the courage to ask some noob questions. I'd prefer to buy used stuff where I can, but don't want to get crappy equipment. I noticed that lots of advice says to go and shoot bows.... but in all honesty I'm not sure how to evaluate or where to go. I went to a Sportsman's Warehouse today at lunch to talk to some sales folks, and when I got to their archery department, there were 5 customers and one sales slug.... not exactly a great ratio for me to feel comfortable asking dumb questions. So here are my questions:

    I used to shoot a 45# bow that I would overdraw to about #50 lbs at 31". I am 5'11 and have long arms and legs (think missing link). However, I want to start to shoot with a release, so I am assuming that will shorten the draw some. How do I figure out what my draw will be?

    I'd like to stay sub $500 for a bow that I can feel comfortable with for hunting and beginning 3D. Sorry to ask this question, but given that budget, can you recommend used bows to consider? I'm hoping to score something with a sight, stabilizer, quiver.

    Regarding releases, do these attach directly to the main bowstring, or is there an integrated loop in the string that they attach to? I have never seen one used....

    Am I opening myself up to a potentially dangerous situation by buying a used bow off of ebay or elsewhere? Can modern bows be damaged by improper storage?

    Thanks in advance for any guidance. More questions to follow for sure!

    Regards,

    Frank
     
  2. bullfiddle

    bullfiddle Movin on up!!!

    11,308
    1
    0
    First of all Frank :welcome: to the forum and welcome to one of the most frustrating and most enjoyable hobby's you could have gotten yourself into...:laugh:

    Their are all types of equipment to try and it can be a bit overwhelming. First of all I would recommend a trip to an Archery Pro shop. I am not talking about a big box store like a Cabelas or a Gander Mountain. Find yourself a good old fashion bow shop where they live and breathe archery. If you don't know of one in your area I am sure one of our members would be more than happy to make a recomendation of where you could go in your area.

    You need to truly establish what your draw length is first. The pro shop will help with that. There are a few different formulas for figuring draw length but they will only get you close and they don't work for everybody.

    Most archery pro shops will sell last year model bows at a discount price just to move them to make room for the new lines. Most Archery shops that I have been to also sell used equipment as well. You can buy used bows from Ebay or AT or even here. Just realize that you are buying mostly sight unseen. Couple of things to look for is does the seller have a good feedback rating and ask for his phone number and address and call the seller and ask questions before you agree to buy.

    Now for the release shortening your draw length. A release will change your anchor point on your face but shouldn't really change your draw length. The key to this is getting the right draw length to begin with. Most Archers today want to shoot from the back of the valley which todays bows have a hard wall at full draw. Years back they didn't you could shoot all over the valley and they were spongy. There a basically 3 ways that you can shoot a release on a bow now days. 1) straight off the string you can shoot a caliper type release this way but it is hard on the string serving. 2) you can shoot a rope release. This is a release that has a rope loop that wraps around the string and then attaches to some type of hook on the release. This type of release is easier on the string and is a great release for target shooting but not for hunting for obvious reasons. 3) is a string loop that is tied with a special knot above and below the knock point of the arrow. I would say this is the most popular style going today. This type of loop is easier on the serving and you can attach a release to it quickly for hunting.
    There are literaly hundreds of different releases available out there and everyone has there favorites.

    This is a good starting point if there are more specific questions you have post em up and I am sure someone will chime in....:D
     

  3. NM_Shooter

    NM_Shooter Junior Member

    5
    0
    0
    Thanks for the reply. I live in Albuquerque, so if anyone can suggest a shop I'd appreciate it. I have not looked around much.

    I'd optimally like to find a shop with a range and someone who I can get lessons from. I'm wary of shops that are just looking to sell the bow with the highest margin... I'd ultimately prefer to build a long term business relationship with a professional establishment. With the right shop and right folks, I'll buy my stuff new.

    How is draw length set on most bows? Do you adjust the length of string, cam change, or arm settings?

    For you elk hunters out there, what is the minimum weight bow I should consider?

    For shooting 3-D, it appears that there are velocity limitations. Are there "easy" ways to dial down your bow to acheive lower speed?

    What makes a bow more hunting friendly? Short limbs / lightweight ??? What makes a bow more target friendly?

    How well do drop away rests work?

    On some bows, I notice a very heavy loop of rope hanging off of them (usually looks to be about a 6" loop). What is this for?
     
  4. goldflinger

    goldflinger Senior Member

    707
    0
    0
    A short bow is handy in the brush, but older longer bows are fine. Whatever you can shoot the best. The 6 inch loop goes over your wrist. The idea being you don't grip your bow real tight, (it helps with consisitency) and the loop keeps your bow from bouncing off the ground.:doh: I don't now of any quick way to adjust the poundage or speed of your bow.:wave: Hope this helps
     
  5. goldflinger

    goldflinger Senior Member

    707
    0
    0
    I don't elk hunt. Not to many in Wisconsin. sorry. Drop away rests are a great way to go. A whisker biscut is also nice in that it holds your arrow no matter which way swing or tilt your bow.
     
  6. bullspotter

    bullspotter Senior Member

    1,047
    0
    0
    as a avid elk hunter, i would say their is really no min poundage, shoot as much as your comfertable with, If you shoot 65 all the time, and thats what you are usto, dont crank it up to 75 just to hunt elk, I use 67 for all my hunting, its plenty, shot placment is more important then how hard you hit it...... dont over do it with the draw weight, Its a differnt story drawing your rig back in a heated indoor range then it is at a big bull in oct when its 23 deg outside and youv been sitting for a few hours and are kinda cold......

    Some bows have cams that you can adjust to make the DL longer or shorter, some you need to replace the cams. Depends on the make of the bow.

    I do prefer a shorter bow for hunting, you may find your self shooting in odd positions though brush, kneeling ect....... give a little more room to shoot if in a confined area.

    Most compound bows you can adjust the draw weight by loosinging or tighting the limbbolt that goes thought the limb into the riser, You could slow down the arrow speed by making less draw weight, but you will also change other tings like arrow tune. ( may make your arrow have to much spine) It may also adjust your pin settings, you might hit a little lower.. ext, I think alot of the 3d shoots have speed maxes in the 285 range + %5 for error. Thats plenty of speed for hunting.
     
  7. Pinwheel1969

    Pinwheel1969 #1 THREAD KILLER

    1,999
    0
    0
    Well now that you have a set limit $$$ your half way there. Well what you can figure is for a bow costs. Then add $150.00 $250.00 in accessories. The good thing is when you get all set up. your ready for 3d. Alot hunters shoot hunter class 3d. Which is there hunting rigs.
    I would find a reputable pro-shop in your area. Let them know what your idea's for hunting and 3d. They will be able to help you. You should actually shoot some different brands in your price range. try different sights , Stabilizers, release's. Until you get the combo your happy with. Make sure they get your correct draw length too. Good luck!!!!
     
  8. Werd

    Werd Senior Member

    1,230
    0
    0
    Hey, :welcome: If you have 500$ to work with I would personally go with new. You can get a package deal which is quiver, sights, rest, everything set to go, depending on brand and year of bow for under 500$. I got my bow in a package for 299 new. If I would have had 500$ Bowtech was calling me:peace:. Just do as others said, don't be affraid to go ask question, even if they are dumb, do you think the most experienced archers got to where they are over night? If you want to learn, ask questions and keep on shooting.
     
  9. Pinwheel1969

    Pinwheel1969 #1 THREAD KILLER

    1,999
    0
    0
    I agree. You can get a new 2008 PSE Stinger Package for under $500.00. And its a sweet shooter. check it out at www.pse-archery.com