Overdraw?

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by joekidd, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. joekidd

    joekidd Member

    56
    0
    0
    I am wondering if i should go with an overdraw on my new setup.
    I have a Hoyt Vtec, and Hoyt offers an overdraw/dropaway combination made to fit the Tec riser.
    What would be the advantages or disadvantages of having one?
    Would this affect the forgiveness of the bow?

    Any help would be appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Joekidd
     
  2. Chris

    Chris Administrator Staff Member

    4,078
    5
    38
    I am not a fan of overdraws at all. You need perfect form to shoot one. Any slight torque issues are magnified by an overdraw.

    Overdraws were designed so you could cut arrows short to get more speed. Todays bows are so fast and overdraw is unecessary and usually make for an unforgiving shooting bow.

    If you have perfect form, you can shoot one. But most people shoot worse with it than without it.
     

  3. joekidd

    joekidd Member

    56
    0
    0
    Thanks Chris,

    That's all I need to know. Looks like a standard drop-away for me. Any suggestions?
     
  4. bfisher

    bfisher Senior Member

    816
    4
    0
    Joe,

    The old reasons for overdraws are long gone. As mentioned, the idea was so you could shoot a shorter, lighter spined arrow to gain more speed. With the advent of thin walled aluminums and carbon arrows it's just not useful anymore.
    As mentioned, because the rest is mounted behind the grip (pivot point) of the bow and movement is exaggerated so accuracy can be greatly affected.

    Also, there are carbon arrows out today that weigh anywhere from 20gr/in down to about 6gr/in which allows an archer to shoot much lighter arrows at full length. Longer arrows are more stabile in flight so have the tendency to be more accurate.

    Just make sure you don't choose too light of an arrow. The higher the poundage and longer the draw can produce much more stress on the limbs and other parts. The general rule is a minimum of 5gr/lb of bow weight. This can produce the highest speeds, but often you want a little more weight in a hunting arrow to make the bow more quiet. Something like 6gr/lb or even a little more can work well.
     
  5. kevin

    kevin Junior Member

    1
    0
    0
    What is a over draw.I shoot a 3d rover that sits behind the grip is this a over draw??????
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Administrator Staff Member

    4,078
    5
    38
    Kevin,

    No your rest is not an overdraw. An overdraw usually is a bracket that extends back toward the string and then the rest is attached to the bracket. This moves the rest mounting position back somewhere between 1-4 inches.

    I have attached a picture of an overdraw bracket and rest.
     
  7. DTP_HoytTec

    DTP_HoytTec Member

    37
    0
    0
    Overdraw = NO WAY!

    Move out of the past and shoot straight. Hoyt's are made and designed to shoot better for you if you shoot the right way. I would recommend no overdraw and take a look at NAP's Quicktune Dropaway 2000 RG. Very nice set up and goes well with the bow.

    hope this helps.

    DTP_HoyTec
     
  8. CoyoteHunter

    CoyoteHunter Member

    39
    0
    0
    Overdraw

    Well here is my 2 cents worth i own 3 bows and have a overdraw on all of them i personly like them im use to the short brace height im looking to buy a 06 reflex and will morethan likley put one on it too but this is just my opinion
    Joe
     
  9. hoagie27

    hoagie27 Junior Member

    32
    0
    0
    overdraw?????

    For some of us a overdraw is STILL the only way we can make weight even with todays light arrows. Also the "pivot point" is not grip, it is the wrist and any overdraw past wrist is going to be critical and almost perfect shooting form is needed for that......