question on arrow spine

Discussion in 'Beginners Archery Range' started by dustinpedley, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. dustinpedley

    dustinpedley Junior Member

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    i have a mathews switchback, 70#, and i shoot a 28.25" arrow. i have my arrows that im using this year Beaman ics's but im gonna be building a new set. fist off i dont know weather to go heavy or light as far as gpi goes and thee spine im getting confused with too, some shafts are splined at 55/75, and 70/90. which one should i be in the low side of the spline or the high end with the 55/77 range. and what would you say the best choice would be for lets say out to 35yds. i have lots of questions with contradictory answers, so needless to say im confused
     
  2. tnts79

    tnts79 Senior Member

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    Well, you will get a lot of different responses on here about which arrows are the best.:argue: I shoot 5575 gold tip xt hunters and have had 0 troubles with them. You can shoot 5575's just fine from your setup. The lighter arrow you shoot, the flatter it's trajectory. The benefit of a flatter trajectory is you have a little room for error in judging distances in the field, the downside to flat shooting arrows is less pin gap on your sight. It really depends on if you want a heavy arrow at slower speeds or a lighter arrow at a higher speed. Aim for a finished arrow weight of around 400 grains. That will give you decent speed and more than enough KE. Personally, I shoot a 390 grain arrow out of my trykon set at 65lbs with a 29" draw.
     

  3. tnts79

    tnts79 Senior Member

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    Oh, and welcome to the forum:welcome:!
     
  4. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    One thing you can check out is a free download from Easton. They have an "Arrow Shaft Selector" software application that you can download for free. Beman arrows are also included in that software. It takes into account finger or release aid, draw length, arrow length, brace height, peak bow draw weight, point weight, etc... You can try different setups to see what arrow spine it recommends. It's a nice tool and you can use it to learn about how, for example, point weight affects arrow spine among other things.

    You can download it from www.eastonarchery.com

    Ron
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2007