rangefinder experience

Discussion in 'Bowhunting forum' started by J.Blay, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    May be buying a rangefinder with inclinometer, or ARC as Bushnell calls it. I get one pricey "toy" this year and it's a toss up between a 40 cal. semi auto pistol, or a rangefinder. Looking at the Leupold RXII or a Bushnell scout 1000 with ARC. The Nicon made for bow is out, because it only works for short range. Any experience or suggestions will be appreciated.
     
  2. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    I don't use a range finder so I have no clue....

    Ron
     

  3. dbdcougar

    dbdcougar He Who Drops His Bow Arm

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    I use a Bushnell and range the area from the ground ahead of time. I don't climb real high ~16' so I don't need to adjust too much for that.
     
  4. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    Yeah, I put markers out in three lines 5 yards apart from the base of each tree I have a stand in. Just cheap flourescent marking paint on the ground.
    Works really well.

    Ron
     
  5. OB1.25

    OB1.25 Junior Member

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    Range finder

    My wife bought me the Bushnell scout 1000 w/ARC before the start of season last year. i have been happy with it so far. In the bow or ARC mode it only works out to 100 yards, but will range further than that. it has some nice features. it has different settings, about 7 or 8, for different caliber guns so it will tell you how high to hold at the longer yardages. if you need any other info on the Scout just let me know.:biggrin1:
     
  6. bullspotter

    bullspotter Senior Member

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    not sure about the arc rangefinders, But i have used a rangefinder for several years, I just got a new pair of binos with built in one, will be really nice. I tend to use mine alot more in my tree stands, range trails, bushes ext before the animals come, also kinda depends on what kind of hunting you do, if you do alot of walk-stalk ground hunting, you will be able to use it, but not as much, as distances change alot when your walking in on moving animals, you dont want to get so usto it that you need to range everthing your trying to shoot, you may not always have the time to range or might have to much movement to. But its awsom if you can range the animal, a little extra insurance!!
     
  7. lungbuster

    lungbuster Senior Member

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    I have the rxII

    I like it alot there are alot of modes on it. There really is not that much of a diff in yardage from a tree I use it and it tells both. if you want to save money just buy a nikion regular one like the 440 . just my 2 cents
     
  8. MoSkeeter0311

    MoSkeeter0311 New Member

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    I don't know much about rangefinders, but I do know a little about pistols.

    If it's your yearly pricey toy, figure out which you would use more.

    Why do you want a .40 cal? If you're just going to be shooting at a range they are a lot more expensive to shoot. I have 2 of them. (Glock 27, Beretta 90-two)If it's for personal protection a .40 has more knockdown than a .9mm but unless the person is on pcp or something a few torso shots with either will definetly get his attention. I have a couple of .9mm that I love.(Kahr, Beretta PX4,Sig P250,Walther P38) Look at the PX4 Storm by Beretta (I love mine, 9 mm.) and the springfield Armory's new XDM They both come in 9mm or ,40 cal. I have the XDM on order as we speak in 9 mm.

    If you want something "differant" but in a revolver look at the "Judge" by taurus. It shoots either a 3" 410 or a .45 interchangably. My buddy just got one and it is a blast to shoot (No pun intended) (5 Shots)
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2008
  9. Akoni

    Akoni New Member

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    I have the Nikon Rifle Hunter. It is very easy to use as it only has two modes to avoid setup confusion. Depending on the mode selected, it will either tell you the straight line distance or the horizontal distance to the target. It will range roughly 11 to 500+ yds (depending on conditions and target quality). I prefered it over the Bushnell Scout and have been happy with it.

    My other rangefinder is a Leica Geovid bino and it is absolutely awesome although heavy (as all good binos seem to be). The optics are simply amazing.
     
  10. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    I wan't a .40 cal. because I have bear where I bow hunt. A couple year ago, one came out of hibernation (warm winter) and liked my deer bait. I've shot a S&W 40, and a 357 mag. The S&W fit me much better. In Michigan, I must have a CSW permit to carry a side arm while bowhunting. The 40 cal. seems like a minimum to me for black bear, as unlikeley as it may be that I will have a need. I still get a little jumpy creeping through that swamp at 5 am. HEY! WHAT WAS THAT NOISE? YIKES!
     
  11. dbdcougar

    dbdcougar He Who Drops His Bow Arm

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    I think if I was choosing one for the unlikely event of stoppping a bear from mauling me (even a black bear) I'd go WAY bigger then a .40, you're probably going to be way closer than you want. 500 or a 460.....a 375H&H rifle would be comforting.... :bowl:
     
  12. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    I'm now leaning toward the Nikon Rifle hunter. Most simple to use, competitive price and good quality. It will range a deer out to 550 yards. Thanks for the tip.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2008
  13. Akoni

    Akoni New Member

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    You won't be disappointed with the Nikon if you go that way.
     
  14. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    Just ordered one last night for 250.00. Seemed like a good price. I'll let you know how I like it.
     
  15. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    Got my Nikon Riflehunter rangefinder last Saturday, and I love it. It's simple to set up and use, has good optics, and is less expensive than the Bushnell or Leupold base models with angle compensators. I hunt from 8 different tree stands, so It's important for me to be able to range my land marks after I get in my tree, to minimize my time on the ground. I won't hang markers because it attracts other hunters, and there's no way I can remember which trees mark what yardage at 8 different hunting locations. Nikon also claims this range finder will range deer out to 550 yards. This may come in handy when I rifle hunt the power lines, where I often see deer out to 1000 yards. 550 yards is a long shot in Northern Michigan. Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I wasn't even aware this model existed until I read the responces to my first post.:thumb:
     
  16. Slippy

    Slippy Buckeyes #1

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    you're so awesome.

    I still don't understand the whole idea of compensating for terrain with a range finder? Its a laser beam that shoots a straight line. Why does terrain matter? Your arrow will travel in a straight line as well. :noidea:
     
  17. Akoni

    Akoni New Member

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    You're not compensating for terrain but the difference in elevation between you and your target. If you are above your target, you need to compensate by shooting at some sight value less than the straight line distance. It really becomes more of an issue with steep angles or longer distance shooting.