Release technique

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by radtuck, Aug 16, 2006.

  1. radtuck

    radtuck Junior Member

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    I have a Tru Ball release that I like using, but I have issues with consistency. I anchor at the same point each time (right below my earlobe), but it seems that some of my releases are jerky. I tried varying the position of my wrist, and the tightness of the strap around my wrist, and it seems to work best if the release strap is a little loose, allowing the strap to rest on the palm of my right hand at full draw. However, when I squeeze the trigger, sometimes the flexion of my finger pulls the string away from my anchor point and the arrow flies to the left. I am getting frustrated!! Some days I can shoot an awesome group, and some days my arrows are all over the place. Anyone have some tips about the correct way to use this release? I need to figure out the problem.
     
  2. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    My suggestion is to sit at about 5 yards from the target, if that. Draw back, aim, close your eyes and concentrate on the release, focus on how it feels. If you stretching to reach the trigger you know its to long, if your having to curl up your finger to touch the trigger you know its to short.

    My guess would be that your trigger isn't out far enough, my reason for guessing this is because you like wearing the strap lose which means you want the trigger out further then where it is now.

    Also, if you have a velcro wrist strap I suggest making some sort of mark, its pretty tough to get the strap on exactly the same every time, especially if your wearing it lose.

    let me know if I didn't make any sense... i'm could just be babbling
     

  3. killbambidead

    killbambidead bambi killer

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    you could put a kisser button on the string and all youd have to do is toutch it to the corner of ur mouth and ur anchoring in the same spot
     
  4. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    I think he issue is with when he releases, but I may have misunderstood him.
     
  5. killbambidead

    killbambidead bambi killer

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    o i though he wasnt anchoring in the same spot my bad
     
  6. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    he may have been? I'm not sure I was right either... we need some more info.
     
  7. Allen

    Allen Senior Member

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    A wrist / trigger release is just about the easiest release there is to punch. So many of us were taught to just slowly pull the trigger with our index finger. There is no better recipe for anticipation, jerking and other forms of target panic.

    Dredly's advice is very good. In addition you will want to learn a different way of releasing the arrow. One way to trigger the release that Michael Braden uses is to make a hook out of your index finger. You don't want the finger to move, but as you pull through the shot slightly relax your hand to let the wrist strap move and this pushes the trigger into your finger. The instant of firing will be a surprise and you will be able to hold a lot steadier at the moment of firing. A couple of other things - be sure that your draw length and anchor point are adjusted so that you can have a straight line from the arrow tip through your anchor to the tip of your elbow. Also, pull through the shot with your back muscles. It's probably more accurate to say that you are pushing your elbow back than to say that your are pulling on the bow. If you can get every thing adjusted so that you can visualize pushing your elbow straight back in line with the arrow, your sight won't dip or jerk at the moment of truth.
    The only way to learn to do this consistently is on a blank bale. It's boring as can be, but is worth it for accuracy.
    Good luck and let us know how it works out for you,
    Allen
     
  8. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    Excellent advise here by Dredly, blank bailing is the best thing for getting a feel for the release.:rockon: Although it is very boring it is great medicine. :peace:
     
  9. BUNNYMAN

    BUNNYMAN I pray for you!

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    and nobody likes the taste of medicine.....but it does cure us and make us feel better sometimes......:laugh:
     
  10. bullspotter

    bullspotter Senior Member

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    could this be caused by not aiming??? can you hold your pin really still on the x ring or is your bow wondering a bit when you exicute the shot?? I had the same problem, Now when i shoot, i dont even think of pulling on the trigger till i hold almost totaly still on the spot for 2 or 3 seconds. Its tough if you dont shoot much, might need to crank the weight down abit. Even if im not dead center on the x, like off to the right or left a bit, i still catch it as long as im holding still and just sqeeze the shot, if the bow wonders while you shoot, grouping goes away. Blank bail is a great idea, because you dont worry about where you hit, you concentrait on your form and shot alot more when theirs no target, is shoot blank bails alot.......
     
  11. radtuck

    radtuck Junior Member

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    I need to try the bale technique. I went out today and shot a few dozen times, and my groupings were much better. I extended the release a bit and that seemed to help. Now the trigger rests in the first joint of my index finger, which feels much better. I still think about the shot too much, so I think that the blank bale technique will work well. As far as how well I can steady the shot, I have been able to be pretty still before the shot....it's the trigger pull that was bothering me. The extension helped a lot, now I need to work on the head game. You guys are awesome!!! Thanks for the advice.
     
  12. Dredly

    Dredly Site Guru

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    who us? awesome? NAH :humble:

    Keep us posted on how ya do... and start shooting multiple targets, it gets expensive replacing fletchings :)

    Its just like shooting a rifle, slowly pull on the trigger until it goes off. You don't want to know exactly when its gonna go off
     
  13. Allen

    Allen Senior Member

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    Dredly, I have to respectfully disagree with you on that advice. What you are descibing is punching the trigger. It's a slow punch, but still a punch. If your mind is connected to the trigger in any way, you will almost certainly develop problems. If you shoot a lot, it will be sooner.

    I agree with you that you want the shot to be a surprise. To do that your conscious mind must become nothing more than an "observer" of the pin on the target. I know that this sounds a little flakey, but you will be the most accurate if you are executing the release subconscously and putting all of your conscious focus on the target. The human mind can focus on only one thing at a time. If your mind is jumping back & forth between the release and the target, you will eventually flinch, jerk or freeze.

    Typically, an archer who is using a release becomes comfortable with punching the trigger at the exact moment that their pin crosses the target. And, usually up until that point, they are doing pretty well at hitting what they are aiming at.

    But then... they notice a slight flinch. Still... the majority of their arrows are on target... but every now and then... they have a few "fliers" due to this little annoying "flinch". If not corrected, it continues to get worse, until their confidence is shot, and they are not sure if they can hit the target with their next arrow.

    Radtuck, Ia very good resource is the Michael Braden video. Michael successfully competes at the highest levels with a wrist trigger release. For shooters using that, it is the best available information. He explanes and demonstrates the best way to do it.

    Good luck,
    Allen
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2006