Spine question.

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by MickeyBee, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. MickeyBee

    MickeyBee New Member

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    If you knew the weak point of spine for your arrows would you orient that point verticaly or horizontally. Would appr your opinions for both fingers and releases.
     
  2. Hook Em

    Hook Em Slippy for President

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    :noidea: you got me on this one. I just nock it and shoot it :wave:
     

  3. Ronhop

    Ronhop RIP

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    I have read that you just want the stiffest part of the arrow oriented the same for every arrow relative to how the arrow is nocked to the string. So, all arrows having stiffer part of the spine up or all down. Problem is that you need to have pretty sensitive feelings to figure out where the stiffer part of the spine actually is unless the manufacturer marks it on the shaft. I did see one manufacturer, Victory I think, have one of their premium arrows marked for the stiffest part of the shaft spine.

    Having said that, when you build a fishing rod you want the stiffer part of the blank on the top, with the guides whipped onto the weaker part of the blank.

    Hope that helps some.

    Ron
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
  4. Tenderfoot

    Tenderfoot New Member

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    reply

    from my understanding of physics, you would want the back end stiffest because that is where the most weight pushes againt the string compressing it. The front only has to overcome the inertia of the point, wheras the back must also push the rest of the arrow shaft. But if it is anything like an atlatl dart, this should be the opposite.
     
  5. J.C.

    J.C. New Member

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    I would think vertical for release shooting and horizontal for fingers as a starting point with bare shafts and see how they fly.
     
  6. J.Blay

    J.Blay New Member

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    Modern shafts are so well made, I don't think anyone could tell by hand where the stiff part is. I made an device to find the stiff point of the spine and marked that spot on every shaft. I then put the odd vane on that mark so that every arrow would shoot the same. I found, however, that today's quality carbon shafts are so consistant that it made absolutely no difference in my groups. If I were a world class shooter, it might, but that's not likely to happen for a backwoods arrow flinger like me. I'm obsessed with my bow and arrows, and I love to tinker, but I found it to be a waste of time given my skill level.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
  7. MickeyBee

    MickeyBee New Member

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    The reason I asked was because I've made a tool to check straightness/spine and found that my ACC's would generaly have a weak spot of about .008-.010" with a 2# weight on them. I will probably never be able to detect any diff in my shooting, working this issue, but I figure that if I pay attention to enough small things, such as this, it may help down the road.
    Thanks for your replys.
     
  8. tpoof

    tpoof "saskarcher"

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    ever hear of float testing bareshafts...
    as long as they are oriented all the same it would be no problem either way
    and make a diff only if you were after the greatest amount of accuracy
    most folk would not notice the diff... myself included.
     
  9. MickeyBee

    MickeyBee New Member

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    Never heard of float testing but I am always open to something new. Would love to know more about the process.
     
  10. tpoof

    tpoof "saskarcher"

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    Well, I may have taken your question wrong but anyways,,
    float testing your bareshaft is taking an arrow, sealing up the ends and floating it in a tub or container of water.
    Some shafts will have a definate high side to them for whatever construction reason and this would be marked as to high side then all shafts would be oriented regarding this side...
    whether you have this side up, down or sideways does not matter, what matters is that they are all the same.. (this is what I thought you were refering to in your thread)
    anyways its just one more variable that can be eliminated in the quest for ultimate accuracy
    as I have also stated "most folk would not properly realize this small of a difference.. myself included"
    however if cash is on the line...

    just another archery tidbit :D
     
  11. MickeyBee

    MickeyBee New Member

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    Thanks for that tp. Never gave that a thought. Don't know if I am going to say this correctly but would that indicate the axial center of gravity or the low spot on an arrow that is not straight or are they the same?

    I guess I should have asked:

    Does anybody have the formula that shows the best arrow flight given the angle between the axial center of mass relative to spine and verticle.:D

    In the real world I don't think any of this realy matters. I just thought it would be fun to kick this thing arround a bit. Who knows...maybe it does matter :noidea:

    Thanks again for your replys.