Steady Aim

Discussion in 'General Archery Forum' started by Ancient Archer, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. Ancient Archer

    Ancient Archer New Member

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    I've been experiencing a wandering, or drifting, with my bow hand as I try to settle steadily on the target. I can't seem to keep the pin on the target long enough to squeeze off the release. In fact, I'm also conscious of my finger creeping the trigger towards release. I've polished the trigger to give a smoother release, but that hasn't really helped. I've even tried tensioning my back, as I've read, to cause the release to let go. Not having much luck.

    Suggestions?
     
  2. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    You will float around the target a little. I don't think anyone is rock solid on the X. But Back Tension is the key. You may want to get the book "Core Archery" by Larry Wise. Very good book. Take care.:peace:
     

  3. Ancient Archer

    Ancient Archer New Member

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    Thanks for the recommendation. That books sounds like a winner. It's on my buy list this week at B&N. I'm also going to pick up "Tuning Your Compound Bow" by Larry Wise. Looks like you put me onto a good author.
     
  4. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    Yep Larry know archery. Good luck. Also we have a member here Xquest who knows a thing or two about the game. I'm sure he would help ya out in any way he can.:peace:
     
  5. Allen

    Allen Senior Member

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    There is a difficult drill that may help you. Difficult because it requires a level of commitment and dedication that most don't have.

    Set up a clean target, go to the distance that you most often shoot, draw, aim, hold for a few second, then let down.

    Make sure that you hold good form during the holding phase of the drill. You only want to hold for as long as it normally takes for you to execute a shot, no more that 10 seconds. Later, you may want to stretch this out a couple more seconds, but this is not an exercise to build muscle. It's a drill to convince you that you can hold steady on target through a shot. It also is one way to reduce the range of motion that almost everyone's pin has while holding on target.

    It usually takes several hundred repetitions to see any improvement. And you should continue for several hundred more to ingrain it into your subconscious.

    This is as boring as it can be, but your shooting will reap benefits that you can't imagine now.

    Hope this helps,
    Allen
     
  6. wyoming4x4

    wyoming4x4 Guest

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    vision

    I was watching some olympic shooters on you tube. Noticed they shoot with both eyes open. When I shoot I can not do this. I have to close my left eye to shoot, right handed shooter.
     
  7. BowhuntnHoosier

    BowhuntnHoosier Bisquit.......

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    You my friend are left eye dominant. I too have this problem but refuse to shoot left handed. But if you can it would be the best thing to do. Take care.:peace:
     
  8. wyoming4x4

    wyoming4x4 Guest

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    Interesting info

    Well that makes sense now that you say it. I recently had Lasik surgery to my eyes and love it. I used to be the guy with the coke bottle lenses. I had terrible vision. Totally dependent on glasses. Now I'm not. It has been a life changine event for me. Its one of their new procedures. I was still on the high side of the canidate program. Was not a canidate for any of the other programs out their. used to shoot the fuzz as i called it with glasses. Now I can see stuff like I never seen before. They can fix that also if you request it on dominate eye situation. crazy stuff. helped my shooting tremendiously. Now got to work out the dominate eye thing now.
     
  9. bfisher

    bfisher Senior Member

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    Floating around the spot is quite normal. As mentioned, it is impossible to hold rock steady. However, and this takes some dedication, too, that playing around with your draw length can help.

    Rarely is anybody a 29" draw, or 29.5" or whatever number you care to plug into the equation. If your draw length is too long you'll have a tendency to wander, usually in a sideways figure 8 motion, but it will be slow but never get steady. If you get too short you'll have the same motion, but it will be more jerky. If you play around and find the most optimum length for you you'll still float, but mostly the pin will stay somewhere on the bullseye. This takes a lot of time and dedication to find that "sweet spot". Most don't have the patience or perseverance.

    This works hand in hand with using good back tension. To use the back muscles properly the bow's draw length needs to be optimized.

    Get that draw figured out to the 1/8th inch and it can pay real dividends.
     
  10. XQuest

    XQuest New Member

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    Find a Good shooter

    One better than you and someone you look up to.Try to hang with him and absorb all you can from him.There is no faster way to improve your game than by example. Sometimes it takes one on one to get it.